Insane Local News Screw-Ups: The Best Laugh-Out-Loud News Gaffes From September In One Video

Local TV news usually takes a beating from critics, and let’s face it, sometimes your hometown news broadcast seems more like amateur hour than professional journalism. And with the end of the month of September 2014 now upon us, this is a good time to look back on the previous 30 days of local news and have a laugh at the most insane moments from around the country — and the world.

This video, compiled by the folks at the aptly-named News Be Funny YouTube channel, features some of the most hysterical gaffes, blunders, inappropriate gestures and just plain surreal moments that local news broadcasts served up this month.

One warning, however. The 10-minute video does contain profanity — all of it inadvertently broadcast live on the air via various local news programs. But if you are offended by off-color language — especially coming out of the mouth of former heavyweight boxing champ Mike Tyson — you should not watch the video.

Which would be too bad, because profanity or not, there are some seriously funny moments in this News Be Funny video. Some of them, The Inquisitr brought you earlier, such as marijuana legalization advocate Charlo Greene quitting her job live on the air in an extremely blunt way.

You may have also seen the ridiculous interview by a Denver local news anchor and former Saturday Night Live cast members Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader, in which the anchor asks Wiig if she has any advice for him on how to do the news completely nude.

The video also includes an interview with Downton Abbey actor Dan Stevens, in which a female interviewer asks him — not once but twice —if he had to “beat off a lot of men” to get his role in the new movie The Guest.

Fans of WWE wrestler Chris Jericho will get to see their hero deliver a weather report in his own inimitable style.

All of this is pretty funny, but it’s worth noting that local news does not need to be bad. A recent study showed that local news actually produces higher ratings when it focuses on serious topics with in-depth reporting, rather than the silliness and sensationalism that local news programs often feature in an attempt to draw an audience.