Mitt Romney Casts Early Vote But Says It Wasn’t For President Trump

U.S. Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) is seen during a hearing before Senate Foreign Relations Committee October 22, 2019 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.
Alex Wong / Getty Images

On Wednesday, CNN Senior Congressional Correspondent Manu Raju tweeted that Utah Sen. Mitt Romney has already cast his vote for the forthcoming election, and it wasn’t for Donald Trump.

“I did not vote for President Trump,” the GOP lawmaker allegedly said.

However, Raju claimed that Romney would not reveal whether he cast his ballot for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden or wrote another person in. Romney’s decision drew a mixed reaction on social media, with some noting that he expressed support for the head of state’s Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett.

“When Romney votes to confirm Trump’s SCOTUS nominee he is voting for Trump,” one critic wrote.

“Didn’t vote for him but happy to ram through his justice nomination. Got it,” tweeted another.

“Must tell him if he votes for Barrett, he’s effectively voting for Trump to steal the election,” another chimed in.

Others assumed that Romney was writing-in another option and suggested it would do no favors for Trump’s opposition.

“Writing in someone else is a vote for Trump. Plain and simple,” one user wrote.

As reported by Mediaite, Romney didn’t vote for Trump in the 2016 presidential race either. In 2018, he revealed that he wrote-in his wife, Ann, instead of casting his vote for the Republican candidate. Notably, the lawmaker also voted in favor of removing the head of state from office during the impeachment probe, making him the only senator in United States history to vote for the removal of the leader of their own party.

Despite his opposition to Trump, the U.S. leader considered Romney for secretary of state in 2017. However, the former presidential candidate decided to run for Utah’s Senate instead. Most recently, Trump claimed that he no longer holds a grudge against the lawmaker thanks to his support for his Supreme Court nomination.

President-elect Donald Trump and Mitt Romney dine at Jean Georges restaurant, November 29, 2016 in New York City.
  Drew Angerer / Getty Images

As reported by The Hill, last week, Romney took aim at both the GOP nominee and his Democratic opponents for dividing the country by stoking hatred. Romney began by noting that he has held his tongue thus far in the lead-up to November’s election.

“But I’m troubled by our politics, as it has moved away from spirited debate to a vile, vituperative, hate-filled morass that is unbecoming of any free nation—let alone the birthplace of modern democracy.”

Romney pointed to the president’s repeated personal attacks on his enemies and highlighted the kidnapping plot plotted against Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, which was ultimately foiled by the FBI. Though he also criticized Democrats, the senator emphasized that Biden refuses to engage in personal attacks as much as others.