Donald Trump’s Presidency Is Tantamount To A ‘Death Cult,’ Journalist Says

Donald Trump looks on during a rally
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In a Sunday piece for Salon, journalist Sonali Kolhatkar took aim at the presidency of Donald Trump, which she argued is tantamount to a “death cult.”

According to the activist, large-scale death is not just a feature of Trump’s presidency but a part of his re-election strategy. She pointed to recent reports that suggested that Trump’s adviser, Jared Kushner, decided against a national coronavirus plan due to the fact that his COVID-19 White House team determined that the virus would likely hit Democratic-led states the hardest.

“If it is true that Kushner embraced the idea of COVID-19 deaths as part of a political strategy for Trump’s reelection, there can be no clearer evidence that the Trump presidency fits the definition of a ‘death cult.'”

Kolhatkar pointed to the death of Herman Cain, one of the president’s allies who fell victim to coronavirus after testing positive following his attendance at the president’s comeback rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma. According to the writer, Cain’s death is a “cautionary tale” that exemplifies the dangers of the alleged death cult.

“We should hardly be surprised at this acceptance of death as inevitable,” she wrote, contrasting it with the Republican pushback against gun control laws in the face of violence.

According to the activist, states with the highest life expectancy have more robust gun control, minority protections, and environmental laws, and such states allegedly tend to be Democratic. With this in mind, Kolhatkar pushed for a rejection of Trump’s movement and pushback against people who continue to refuse the advice of medical professionals and public health experts on COVID-19.

“While Trump’s most loyal supporters might choose death in his service, the rest of us need not be bound by their blind, cultish and suicidal ideology.”

U.S. President Donald Trump looks on during an event recognizing the Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride in the East Room of the White House, April 18, 2019 in Washington, DC.
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Professor Tom Nichols also argued in a recent USA Today op-ed that Trump’s movement had effectively become a death cult.

“So committed are these Americans to assuaging their sore egos over their imagined lack of status that they are literally willing to die for it,” he wrote. “Unfortunately, they seem all too willing to take many of us with them.”

The warning signs of the movement’s purported direction were noted some months ago. As The Inquisitr reported, Steven Hassan, author of The Cult of Trump, warned in April that the U.S. leader was on track to become the leader of a death cult.

Notably, Hasan was a former member of the Unification Church, which asked him to kill or die for the movement. Hassan paralleled the president’s following with the church he was a part of, noting that both purportedly view the world in black-and-white terms and do not respect the sacred nature of life.

The comments came around the same time that worries of the economic destruction from coronavirus pushed Trump allies to suggest that Americans should be willing to die to save the economy.