Probe Into Son’s Death In Singapore Sought By Parents

A probe into their son’s death in Singapore is being sought by a Montana couple who believe foul play was involved.

In June 2012, Shane Todd’s body was discovered hanging in his Singapore apartment, in what was initially perceived to be a suicide. However, Shane’s parents, Rick and Mary Todd, believe their son may have been the victim of suspicious circumstances.

Now the couple is asking for US assistance in uncovering what they believe may be a coverup in their son’s death. Singapore officials are also continuing their investigation and the FBI has reportedly agreed to assist domestically.

The Todds speculate that Shane, who worked as an engineer, may have been killed in connection with research he was conducting on material used to make heat-resistant semiconductors.

His work revolved around material that is viable in both civilian and military technology.

In December 2010, Shane began working for the Institute of Microelectronics in Singapore. According to his parents, Shane disliked the job and resigned in May 2012, just one month prior to his death.

According to Rick and Mary Todd, a suicide note found at the scene of their son’s death in Singapore thanked the company — something they say Shane would never do.

Other parts of the suicide note allegedly contained false information such as references to family events that never occurred.

“Absolutely none of it made any sense,” explains Mary Todd. “I knew at that point that he didn’t write that note. From that point on, I believed he was murdered.”

The Todds discovered other mysterious aspects of their son’s death in Singapore when they visited his apartment just days later. It appeared that Shane was in the process of leaving the country.

The engineer had begun to pack his clothes, make arrangements for the sale of his furniture, and had obtained an airplane ticket to the United States.

While the couple was told their son used a rope and pulley method to commit suicide, the Todds found no structural evidence in the apartment to support that theory.

What the couple did find was Shane’s computer hard drive, an item that was missed by authorities during a search of the apartment. According to the Todds, the hard drive contains numerous documents and other evidence that lead them to believe their son’s death in Singapore may have been a homicide.

The couple has now enlisted the help of US Senators Max Baucus and Jon Tester of Montana in an effort to further their request for a US probe into their son’s death in Singapore.

Senator Baucus has reportedly met with Secretary of State John Kerry and Singapore’s US ambassador regarding the situation.

“The Todds’ incredible love for their son and commitment to justice is nothing short of inspiring,” Baucus said in a statement. “I saw it in their eyes, and that’s what is driving me to do everything in my power to make sure no stone is left unturned in this case.”

Rick and Mary Todd have said they will continue to seek support in uncovering the truth behind their son’s death in Singapore.