Trump Reveals Whether He’ll Try To Change Constitution To Run For Third Term

President Donald Trump talks with Marines while visiting Marine Barracks.
Andrew Harrer-Pool / Getty Images

In an interview with Fox News Chris Wallace broadcast Sunday, President Donald Trump discussed speculation that he will be looking to change the United States Constitution in an effort to run for a third presidential term, the Hill reports.

Fueled by an audio recording of Trump’s remarks given in March this year during a behind-closed-doors meeting obtained by CNN, rumors about Trump looking to abolish the 22nd Amendment – passed by the United States Congress in 1947 in order to establish term limits – are apparently continuing to cause an uproar. Following China Communist Party’s decision to abolish presidential term limits, Trump jokingly suggested that the United States should do the same so that he can run for a third presidential term.

“He’s now president for life. President for life,” Trump said of China’s Xi Jinping, “No, he’s great. And look, he was able to do that. I think it’s great. Maybe we’ll have to give that a shot some day.”

But as it turns out, Donald Trump is not looking to run for a third presidential term, and he does not want to change the Constitution. When asked by Fox News Chris Wallace if he could envision a situation in which he thinks that he is “good” enough for the United States to try and want to run for a third term, Trump shot down the host, rejecting the notion of abolishing the 22nd Amendment.

“No. Just won’t happen. I think the eight-year limit is a good thing, not a bad thing.”

Given Trump’s tendency to often publicly brag about his administration’s alleged accomplishments – the POTUS often does this via Twitter – the fact that he is rejecting the notion of amending the Constitution to open the door to a third presidential term may come as a surprise to some, but as an individual known for establishing good relationships with dictators, Trump has been criticized for displaying authoritarian tendencies.

New York Times opinion columnist Thomas L. Friedman observed that Donald Trump appears to feel comfortable spending time with dictators such as North Korea’s Kim Jong Un, the Philippines’ Rodrigo Duterte, and Turkey’s Erdogan, sometimes praising the control they have over their countries’ citizens and government officials.

In August this year, Vanity Fair reported that numerous current and former administration officials have complained to the press about Trump’s alleged propensity for authoritarian thought. “What he enjoys most about this job is finding things he has absolute power over,” one of the officials said, adding that the POTUS appears to be “getting a kick out of” pardons since he enjoys having people “come over to court and beg him.”