ISIS Fighter Butchers Parents For Refusal To Allow Brothers To Join Islamic State

isis fighter butchers parents

An ISIS fighter in Iraq has reportedly murdered his own parents for their protective act of not allowing the fighter to recruit his brothers into the extremist organization. With the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) feeling the strains of attrition on their fighting strength through battle losses and defections, the self-proclaimed caliphate nation has begun what experts call a “scorched Earth” policy as well as initiating recruitment among local youth. Some have even turned to recruiting family members.

The Clarion Project reported last week that an ISIS fighter, bent on recruiting his younger brothers into the religious/militant organization, resorted to “slaughtering” his own parents because they refused to allow such conscription. In a translation from the original report in Al Smumaria News, the ISIS fighter killed both of his parents with a knife.

From the Al Smumaria News translation:

“An Islamic State [ISIS/ISIL] militant has committed a crime against his parents by slaughtering them with a knife in the area of Al Razalani, west of Nineveh, because his parents refused to allow his brothers to be recruited to the organization.”

Further details of the killings were not revealed, so it is unclear as to where the heinous act took place (at the home or in some other location). It is also unknown as to what has become of the ISIS fighter’s younger brothers.

According to the report, though, ISIS has resorted to recruiting (read: forced conscription and voluntary) younger and younger fighters to join their depleted ranks, which are suffering from a “defection of most of its fighters.” The young “recruits” are then placed in youth and camps in Nineveh and the province of Tel Afar, where there are more than five camps for child recruitment and in which the new fighters are taught about “explosives and street fighting.”

But, as earlier reports show, ISIS has also contributed to the depletion of its own numbers through its treatment of those who have simply failed to remain at their posts or have retreated in battle. A stand-your-ground-at-all-costs policy is met with the punishment of death for anyone ISIS deems treasonous.

In May, the Inquisitr reported that a retreating force of ISIS militants buried alive 45 of its fighters in a mass grave for failure to hold their positions against opposition forces. The buried members were executed for fleeing battles in Bashir in the Kirkuk Governate.

Although forced recruiting of young Muslims appears to be fairly recent, there have been reports that the extremists have been training and deploying child warriors for some time. Besides using them as living shields in armed confrontations, ISIS has also been training recruits as young as 13 years of age to carry out missions for Islamic State, according to German Intelligence. Teen recruits drawn in by ISIS propaganda online have not only found their way to the Syria and Iraq to join the extremists, but some have gone so far as to attack authorities and plan assaults within their home or adopted countries.

Portions of northern Iraq and northeastern Syria have been under ISIS control since the summer of 2014. In that time, given the radical regime’s use of the internet to not only proselytize but to openly recruit new members, thousands from all around the world began heading toward the Middle East. According to intelligence estimates (per the New York Times), more than 30,000 recruits from 100 different countries have filled the ranks of ISIS — and that’s just in the past year. That number is double the estimated total of ISIS recruits from outside Syria and Iraq that joined up with the extremists in 2015. Although coalition forces have killed approximately 10,000 ISIS fighters to date, at least a thousand recruits a month quickly replace the fallen. This, despite efforts to enforce antiterrorism laws, increased intelligence and awareness of ISIS and its extremist views, and the strengthening border restrictions.

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