British Sniper Is Deadlier Than American Chris Kyle And Still Active With Royal Marines

British sniper is deadlier than American sniper.

A British sniper is even deadlier than American sniper, Chris Kyle, with 173 confirmed enemy kills and is still active with the Royal Marines.

The military refuses to release the name of the man, who is reportedly married and a father, for fear that it will allow extremist terrorist groups to harm him or his family. However, his reputation is admired not only because of the number of lives he has saved, but due to his modesty.

The Royal Marine was most deadly in the fight against Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan, where the British forces supported Operation Enduring Freedom following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States. The United Kingdom has historically been one of the U.S.’ most loyal allies dating back to the World Wars.

According to a report in the Sun, the corporal made the majority of his kills during a six-month deployment in Helmand Province eight years ago and his actual total kills could be far higher than the official number indicates. The same is the case for the late Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, who has been credited with 162 official kills during four tours to Iraq.

A source revealed to the Telegraph that the identity of the British sniper is a closely guarded secret. The Ministry of Defense refused to comment on the identity of the soldier or his number of kills.

“Only people inside the community know about his incredible contribution — but young recruits are in awe of him. He is one of a unique band of marksmen who have done extraordinary things.”

“He’s not the sort of man to brag. He’s very professional and humble, but with a gun in his hands this bloke is deadlier than the plague. He’s a legend, a unique breed.”

The British sniper served with the Brigade Reconnaissance Force and was armed with an L115A3 rifle — which has an effective range of over 1,200 yards — according to the report. At one point the sharpshooter hit 90-fighters in one day.

“He will never talk about it unless he is challenged directly, then he is never boastful of what has happened — but he is not ashamed either.”

“Every shot was judged and balanced, not indiscriminate. He always saw the men between the cross hairs as humans not as targets. He is not interested in scores or kill counts. He took no satisfaction in the job he had to do.”

“Like all snipers he had to be in a place where his concentration was absolute. Nothing mattered, not the cold, not the discomfort of the ground, just the job.”

British forces reportedly used the marksmen frequently during their campaign in Helmand. The world record for the longest range for a sniper kill is held by a British soldier, and it stands at more than a mile-and-a-half.

Even though this British sniper and American Chris Kyle, have a large number of enemy kills throughout their career, they pale in comparison to the deadliest ever. Simo Häyhä, a soldier from Finland — nicknamed White Death — was credited with 505 sniper kills during the Winter War of 1939 to 1940, when the Soviet Union invaded Finland. During World War II several Soviet sharpshooters were each credited with killing more than 400 German soldiers.

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