Rudy Giuliani Could Be Charged With Racketeering Linked To Election Interference, Report Says

Tyler MacDonald

A Saturday report from The New York Times spotlights Fani T. Willis, the district attorney of Fulton County, and her election interference criminal investigation that could lead to charges against Donald Trump's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani.

According to the publication, Willis and her office are probing the purported false claims Giuliani made before state legislative committees. In letters sent to local agencies and officials, the attorney noted that Georgia law prohibits "any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement" made within any local government department or agency's jurisdiction.

"As she put it in the interview, racketeering could apply to anyone who uses a legal entity — presumably anything from a government agency to that person's own public office — to conduct overt acts for an illegal purpose. In this case, it applies to the pressure the president and his allies exerted on Georgia officials to overturn the election."

Although the news outlet noted that racketeering often conjures images of mob leaders, Willis underlined that the charges can also apply to individuals who use "otherwise lawful organizations" to commit crimes.

"If you have various overt acts for an illegal purpose, I think you can — you may — get there," she said.

As assistant district attorney in 2014, Willis helped spearhead a high-profile racketeering case against educators in the Atlanta public school system who were involved in a cheating scandal. The probe led to the conviction of 11 educators for racketeering — among other crimes.

As for evidence against Giuliani, the case appears to be examining multiple instances where his words could be used against him to press charges. For example, on December 3, Giuliani told the Georgia State Senate committee there was sufficient evidence to conclude that the 2020 election was rigged. Elsewhere, he testified virtually before a local House committee and claimed poll workers in Atlanta were carrying suitcases stuffed with improperly counted ballots — a claim The New York Times said has been proven false.

As The Inquisitr reported, Willis' criminal investigation was opened on Tuesday and will also examine the actions of former President Trump — in particular, his purported attempts to influence the Peach State's election results. Notably, Trump called Republican Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and pressured him to overturn his region's election to favor him instead of Democrat Joe Biden. According to Willis, the former U.S. leader could face conspiracy charges for his alleged crimes.

Another focus of the investigation is Senator Lindsey Graham, who also made a call to Raffensperger to speak about mail-in ballots.

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