Liberal Groups Plan Organized Street Protests In An Effort To Have Donald Trump Held Accountable

'We want to show that this isn’t just some fringe thing, this isn’t just Democrats in D.C.,' said one activist.

a scene from the 2018 womens march
Ethan Miller / Getty Images

'We want to show that this isn’t just some fringe thing, this isn’t just Democrats in D.C.,' said one activist.

Liberal activist groups such as MoveOn and others are planning large-scale, anti-Trump protests in an effort to bring the impeachment fight “to the streets,” The Associated Press reports. When such protests would take place largely depends on when (or even if) the House of Representatives holds a formal vote to impeach Trump.

The Trump presidency has been met with protests large and small since the day he took office. Indeed, on the day of his inauguration — January 21, 2017 — the biggest anti-Trump protest of his presidency took place. The Women’s March, as it was called, drew between 3 and 5 million people to various cities across the United States, according to a Washington Post analysis, plus an untold number in locations around the globe, even Antarctica.

Some activists hope to capture that energy to fuel enthusiasm for Trump’s impeachment.

David Sievers, a campaign director of liberal activist group MoveOn, says that it’s time for the “silent majority” to speak up by taking to the streets.

“People take action when they think they can make a difference, and for a long time a lot of the silent majority on impeachment thought it wasn’t going to happen. We want to show that this isn’t just some fringe thing, this isn’t just Democrats in D.C.,” he said.

the women's march in washington
  Mobilus In Mobili / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Nathaly Arriola, executive director of Need to Impeach, the impeachment effort funded by billionaire Tom Steyer, says that Trump’s impeachment in the House of Representatives is all but a sure thing. The real battle will be in convincing the Senate to vote to remove Trump from office. Such a vote would require 67 votes, or the vote of every Senate Democrat and 20 Senate Republicans.

Loading...

“The real fight that we have in front of us right now is in the Senate, and we won’t succeed there unless we engage in a traditional organizing model. When you’re dealing with the Senate, you have to have organized masses and numbers,” Arriola said.

When the marches would take place, if indeed they take place at all, is not clear as of this writing. Organizers hope to have the marches take place on the day before the House of Representatives formally holds a vote on whether or not to impeach Donald Trump. The House, for now, has not scheduled an official vote on articles of impeachment.

Meanwhile, the House of Representatives is carrying on with its impeachment inquiry, taking depositions behind closed doors, without having held public hearings on the matter.