Queen Elizabeth II Spends Second Day In Hospital For Stomach Bug, All Official Trips Canceled

The Queen is spending a second day in hospital where she will be examined for gastroenteritis symptoms, commonly known as a stomach bug.

The 86-year-old British monarch was admitted to King Edward VII Hospital on Sunday after traveling from Windsor Castle where she had been resting in what is her first hospital stay in 10 years.

Situated in Marylebone, the private hospital is the Royal Family’s medical facility of choice and is where Kate Middleton was treated for acute morning sickness last December.

During Kate’s stay two radio presenters from Australian radio station 2Day FM prank called the hospital while impersonating the Queen and Prince Charles.

The pair spoke to a reception nurse before being transferred to a nurse on the Duchess’ ward. Three days later the first nurse, Jacintha Saldana, was found hanged at her accommodation. A full inquest into the mother-of-two’s death is expected to reopen later this month.

Although Buckingham Palace have described the Queen as being “in good health” and in “good spirits,” she is expected to remain in the King Edward VII hospital for a further two days, said BBC News.

In a statement, the Palace said:

“The Queen is being assessed at the King Edward VII hospital, London, after experiencing symptoms of gastroenteritis. As a precaution, all official engagements for this week will regrettably be either postponed or canceled.”

One of those trips was a scheduled trip by the Queen and her husband Prince Phillip to Rome to visit the Italian president, Giorgio Napolitano. The Royals were due to receive a ceremonial welcome and attend a private lunch as well as visit the Pantheon, the ancient Roman monument where two Italian kings are buried.

Other engagements included a reception for lawmakers at Buckingham Palace this week. It will now go ahead with other members of the royal family standing in.

Apart from the fact that it’s the Queen, huge media interest has greeted news of her condition because she is so rarely ill. Last hospitalized 10 years ago for a minor knee operation, surgeons removed non-cancerous lesions from the Queen’s face at the same time.

According to The Guardian, doctors treating the Queen will be keen to ensure that she is properly hydrated while suffering from the infection, which causes vomiting, fever, and intermittent bouts of diarrhea.

Gastroenteritis causes inflammation of the stomach lining and intestines and can be transmitted through contact with an infected person or contaminated food and drink.

Television crews and photographers were last night gathering outside the hospital and more are outside the hospital today. Inevitably, security is tight.