The Who’s Roger Daltrey Savages Ed Sheeran And Bob Geldolf For Supporting The ‘EU Gravy Train’

'There’s far too many people on far too many gravy trains soaking us dry.'

The Who's Roger Daltrey Performing on stage.
Ethan Miller / Getty Images

'There’s far too many people on far too many gravy trains soaking us dry.'

The Who’s Roger Daltrey has taken pot shots at multi-millionaire celebrities such as Ed Sheeran and Bob Geldolf, accusing them of misleading the British public about the dangers of Brexit.

The Express reports that the “My Generation” and “Won’t Get Fooled Again” singer has trashed claims by a host of fellow singers and musicians that Brexit would be a disaster for the British music industry.

Calling the EU a “gravy train which is soaking us dry,” Daltrey had no qualms about taking digs at those who support remaining in an institution with a “democratic deficit.”

“I’ve been very much in favor of Europe, I was very much in favor of the economic community but I was always, and have always been, against the construct of Brussels. I think it’s a disaster.

“The construct of Brussels and the democratic deficit of it. There’s no direct link between the voter, and to get through to those people that run our lives, and there’s far too many people on far too many gravy trains soaking us dry.”

Dismissing the naysayers such as Geldolf and Sheeran who have expressed their anxiety over what leaving the EU will mean for the British music industry, Daltrey explained that during the golden period of the ’60s and the ’70s the European Union did not even exist.

The Who frontman also had little time for claims that British artists wishing to tour Europe after Brexit will encounter difficulties.

He simply said, “We managed it in the old days.”

Daltrey is something of a lone wolf when it comes to prominent British musicians and Brexit. Most are in favor of remaining in the vast bureaucratic labyrinth of the EU.

Ed Sheeran wearing a baseball hat.
  Vince Caligiuri / Getty Images

Damon Albarn, Jarvis Cocker, Johnny Marr, Brian Eno, and Pink Floyd’s drummer Nick Mason are just a few of the musical multi-millionaires who have thrown their weight behind an anti-Brexit campaign.

Bono, who is not afraid of the ridiculous statement, recently said that “Europe is a thought that needs to become a feeling.”

What that means no one is really sure.

Bob Geldolf, who was once part of a group called the Boomtown Rats who enjoyed a minor hit in the 1970s with “I Don’t Like Mondays,” is the chief instigator of the musicians against the Brexit campaign.

He has declared that the “genuine and global voice of Britain” is music and believes that if Britain does finally manage to seize control back from a bunch of unelected bureaucrats in Brussels and becomes a sovereign state again, then that’ll be the day the music dies.

“The voice of Britain, the genuine, global British voice is music, it has been since the Beatles. No one knows quite why this tiny island produces such vast reservoirs of talent but we do know the entire planet dances, eats, sleeps, and plays hard to our noise.

“That is being endangered by a recklessness which is existential and historically self-damaging.”