Conspiracy Theorists Claim Artifacts Found In Mexico Are Signs Of Past Alien Life

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A recent video featuring a number of artifacts purportedly found in a Mexican cave has some people suggesting that alien life might have made its way to Earth several thousands of years ago.

On Thursday, the YouTube channel UFOMania posted a clip showcasing a variety of sculptures, which the video’s creators noted are likely depictions of aliens, similar to the so-called Klaus Dona artifacts. As described by We Are the Disclosure, Dona is an Austrian “spiritual archaeologist” who is known for his research on unusual, “out-of-place” artifacts that could provide proof of “mysterious civilizations and lost worlds.” His official website offers further details on the artifacts he collects, which allegedly include crystal skulls, “golden” spacecraft, proof of giants who grew to heights of 25 feet, and relics from mythical places such as Atlantis.

According to the Daily Star, the artifacts were found in an unspecified Mexican cave, and are popular among the area’s locals. Some of the sculptures were described as having features associated with stereotypical aliens, such as elongated faces and round eyes, while others were “completely unexplainable” in terms of their appearance. One particular stone piece seemed to feature a drawing of spaceships flying in the sky.

In the two days since it was posted, the video has gotten close to 70,000 views, as well as a variety of comments, including some from viewers who believe that the artifacts back up conspiracy theories of alien life forms having long been in contact with humans. One viewer went as far as saying the purported aliens depicted in the sculptures lived on Earth for more than 7,000 years, and even “created man.”

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Many others, however, took issue with the video’s description, which suggested that it was a good thing farmers and other locals who showed off these artifacts did not send them to the Smithsonian Institute and other organizations for analysis and further study.

“If it looks to good to be true, it’s probably not,” said one YouTube user.

“The fact that they wouldn’t submit them for testing doesn’t help either.”

Although some viewers seemed to believe that the supposed Mexican artifacts are authentic proof that alien life exists, The Sun noted that the UFOMania channel did not offer any details to accompany the video, such as the exact location where the sculptures were found, and specific timelines for the discovery. The channel, in general, focuses on videos showcasing purported alien and UFO sightings, as well as other conspiracy theories, but mainly relies on an automated narrator to describe the videos, with no clips of actual interviews with the people behind the stories.