John Kerry Won’t Apologize For Bombing Hiroshima – Will Visit Peace Memorial Park During G7 Meeting To Pay Homage Though

John Kerry won’t apologize for America’s bombing of Hiroshima during World War II. The United States Secretary of State will, however, visit the Peace Memorial Park to pay homage to those who died during one of the only two instances when an atomic bomb was used.

John Kerry’s arrival to Hiroshima for a G7 meeting marks the first visit by a U.S. Secretary of State to the city. However, Kerry won’t issue an apology, formal or informal, while visiting the nation that America devastated in the closing days of World War II more than 70 years ago. A single atomic bomb dropped by America in August of 1945, and it not only destroyed the city of Hiroshima, it resulted in the death of estimated 140,000 Japanese. Three days later, America dropped a second bomb on the port city of Nagasaki, which obliterated the bustling trading town, killing about 70,000 people.

The issue of apology could have been lingering just below the surface, but an official travelling with Kerry, laid to rest any doubts. Despite the fact that the United States was the only country to use a nuclear weapon during World War II, Kerry won’t extend his apologies on behalf of the country, but, will pay a visit to the Peace Memorial Park and Museum in the city.

Isn’t John Kerry sorry for the devastation the U.S. caused in Hiroshima and Nagasaki? Clarifying Kerry’s stand, the high-ranking official stated that the Secretary of State is aware of the loss of human life.

“If you are asking whether the Secretary of State came to Hiroshima to apologize, the answer is no. If you are asking whether the secretary — and I think all Americans and all Japanese — are filled with sorrow at the tragedies that befell so many of our countrymen, the answer is yes.”

John Kerry will use the opportunity and his visit to the city, to “recognize the huge loss of life” that occurred during the war, noted State Department spokesman Mark Toner. He added that Kerry’s visit will also reiterate the friendship the U.S. and Japan has developed since the end of World War II.

The visit to the memorial is expected to take place Monday. The park has been built on an open field that was created by the explosion, caused by the atomic bomb. Regional experts, legislators, and the public are hoping the location of the summit in Hiroshima will help in promoting better understanding among nations about Japan’s staunch nuclear stance, reported KCCI.

The Peace Memorial Park has been considered as one of the most profound World War II memorials. A museum housed on the premises has become a symbol for nuclear disarmament. Visitors to the memorial park are offered a brief history lesson about the devastation, nuclear weapons can cause. They are made aware of the collateral as well as long-term damage. The lingering effects of nuclear fallout are also shown.

If everything goes as per plan, John Kerry will lay flowers and express the sorrow that “all feel upon reflection about the bombing.” Incidentally, Kerry is the senior most American government official to pay a visit there, reported Chicago Tribune.

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John Kerry’s primary agenda behind visiting Hiroshima might be to convince the G7 leaders about prevention of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, but it appears he is equally interested in paving the way for American President Barack Obama’s visit to the region, reported Hindustan Times. Though the White House hasn’t made any formal announcement, Washington is abuzz about the rumor indicating Obama might visit the region as early as next month to attend the G7 leaders’ summit. It is important to note that no sitting U.S. president has ever paid a visit to the site.

In addition to the U.S., the Group of Seven (G7) industrialized countries include Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy and Japan. The meeting that began today had the leaders discussing numerous world issues including the Syrian war, migrant crisis in Europe, violence in Ukraine, Iraq and Afghanistan.

[Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images]