Anonymous, ‘Charlie Hebdo’ Defiant: ‘They Have Arms’ ‘We Have Champagne!’ [NSFW]

Mathieu Madenian, a columnist with Charlie Hebdo, the French satire magazine that has suffered from two horrendous terrorist attacks, the most recent on January 7, left 12 innocent people dead, including four of the magazine’s cartoonists, posted a preview of the defiant cover of the coming issue. Anonymous, which has showed support for the magazine since January, has promised a series of “cyber attacks” in retaliation for ISIS’ attacks on Friday.

The move represents a continuation of work Anonymous was reported to begin in January of 2015, according to the Independent. RT reports that Anonymous has disabled 5,500 Twitter accounts associated with ISIS.

The cover commemorates the attacks at the Stade de France, Bataclan concert hall, and other locations through the French capital that were terrorized by ISIS perpetrators on Friday night, as reported by the Inqusitr.

Translated, the cover states, “They have arms. F**k them. We have the champagne!” while featuring a man holding an overflowing champagne bottle, drinking from a glass and dancing, while champagne streams out of his bullet-riddled body.

Mark Decambre with MarketWatch called the preview of the Charlie Hebdo cover “classic.”

Charlie Hebdo cartoonist Joann Star posted to Twitter, thanking the world for their prayers and made reference to champagne in the hours following Friday’s attacks. US described the new cover as reflecting the sentiment conveyed in Star’s post.

“Our faith goes to music! Kisses! Life! Champagne and joy!” Star’s message states.

Though ISIS has claimed responsibility for the Friday night attack, it was Al-Qaeda, who split with ISIS in 2014, that claimed responsibility for the January Charlie Hebdo attack. Cartoonist Stephane Charbonnier was reported to have been on an Al-Qaeda list before the attack, according to the Telegraph.

Defiant 'Charlie Hebdo' cover.

The 2011 Charlie Hebdo firebomb attack was reportedly precipitated by the magazine publishing an issue that was “guest edited” by the Prophet Muhammad and named “Charia Hebdo.” The magazine also reportedly wished ISIS leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi a “happy New Year” and “particularly good health,” according to Think Progress.

After the bombing, Charlie Hebdo printed a cover featuring a Muslim man kissing with a Hebdo cartoonist in front of the offices of the publication ablaze.

'Charlie Hebdo' cover defiant.

Charlie Hebdo reportedly came into existence in 1970 when the writers for another publication, Hara-Kiri, all migrated at once after it was banned by the French government for mocking the death of Charles de Gaulle, the French president, according to Time. Charlie is reported to be a reference to Charlie Brown, the comic strip character, and Hebdo short for “hebdomadaire,” which translates to “weekly” in English.

A somewhat notorious issue of Charlie Hebdo featured a cartoon with the “Virgin Mary, spread-eagled, giving birth to Jesus.” The magazine wasn’t published between 1981 and 1992 because of a “lack of funds.” Charlie Hebdo is said to have never found a “wide circulation.”

Time notes that despite its smaller circulation, Charlie Hebdo‘s “incendiary cartoons, which took shots at high-profile figures, including the far right, politicians and celebrities, and religions of all kinds,” helped the magazine make a “name” for itself.

Anonymous supports 'Charlie Hebdo' declares war on ISIS.

“We defend the universality of the freedom of expression, so that a critical spirit can exist in every continent, towards each and every maltreatment and dogma.”

[Feature Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images]