Indian Bride Has Standards, Fails Groom Over Math Test

Math

If you asked your future bride or groom “what is 15 + 6?” And they said “17,” would you cancel the wedding? One Indian bride did.

In India, weddings are still largely arranged by the families of the bride and groom. Sometimes during the arrangement negotiations, positive traits become exaggerated, like a basic math education.

The father of the bride Mohar Singh told BBC News that’s exactly what happened in this Indian wedding.

“The groom’s family kept us in the dark about his poor education. Even a first grader can answer this.”

The bride, named Lovely, walked away from the ceremony after hearing “17.” The groom’s family tried to get her to return, but she refused, saying the man was illiterate.

According to USA Today, the wedding happened in Rasoolabad village, which is near the town of Kanpur in northern Uttar Pradesh state.

With both parties not knowing each other until the big day, accurate information is essential. Not revealing something important, like illiteracy, can be tantamount to fraud. Medical information is also one of those crucial bits of information.

As previously reported by the Inquisitr, another Indian bride recently decided to call it off when the groom went into a seizure during the wedding ceremony. She also claimed the groom’s family had neglected to tell her he was an epileptic.

That bride apparently didn’t want to see the ceremony go to waste, so she asked the audience if any man would like to marry her. One did. And they are now a newly-wed couple.

Lovely was not so ambitious. The local police report that after mediation, both families returned all the exchanged gifts and departed peacefully.

Obviously, education is a valued commodity in India, but it’s not always easy to come by. Wired reports that even though about 97 percent of children age 6 to 14 attend school regularly, illiteracy remains a big issue. Students in Indian schools are not able to fail and repeat a grade. Being promoted to the next year without the necessary skills means that academic achievement becomes harder and harder.

Still, there are other important things for Indian brides.

According to Bustle, six Indian wives, also in Uttar Pradesh, left their husbands’ homes, complaining that they lacked toilets. One of the women explained the situation to BBC News.

“My parents have a toilet at home, but there is no toilet in my husband Ramesh Sharma’s home. Going outdoors was a big hassle, so I fought with him and returned to my parents.”

Nearly 50 percent of rural Indian homes don’t have indoor toilets, according to Bustle. The poor statistics might not last long if Indian brides and wives keep up their high standards for toilets and math scores.

[Image Credit: Getty Images]