united passenger past

Media Continues To Dig Into United Airlines Passenger David Dao’s Life, Uncovers Singing Past

Media outlets the world over are continuing to have a field day at the expense of Dr. David Dao, the United Airlines passenger who was seen being dragged out of his seat in a now-viral video, and his varied past.

Now, along with knowing the Kentucky medical practitioner’s reported criminal history and alleged sexual preference, which was also reported here on the Inquisitr, the New York Post, by way of a handful of Vietnam-based publications, have uncovered that Dao once released music in the Asian country underneath the name “Dao Duy Anh” as part of the melodic collective Bach Viet.

“The embattled physician performed [with Bach Viet],” a traditional Vietnamese music group, “in [the] 1960s and 1970s [in] Saigon,” now known as Ho Chi Minh City, the Post details.

Two of their recordings, “Tat Nuoc Dau Dinh,” a sing-along version of a well-regarded poem in that nation, and “Ta Ve Ta Tam Ao Ta,” have since gone on to become classics that are still played in the country to this very day.

Bach Viet band mate Tran Bo, who confirmed Dao’s standing with the group, went on to remember the United flight passenger as a multi-talented musician who was just as comfortable playing instruments in the past as he was displaying his vocal talents.

united passenger past
United Airlines passenger Dr. David Dao, the man seen beaten and dragged from a flight in a viral video, apparently has a past as a popular 1960s singer from Saigon, the city now known as Ho Chi Minh City. [Image by Pierre Nordique/Wikimedia Commons/Cropped and Resized/CC BY-SA 2.0]

Following the takeover of Saigon by communists in 1975, Dao was said to have fled the country for safer shores, but was welcomed back by his fellow group members for a double set of shows in California to note the 45th anniversary of Bach Viet forming back in 2015.

Additionally, New York Post writers were able to search out a YouTube video of David Dao showing off his musical prowess by way of a live cover of the Beatles classic “Come Together” from a 2013 festival in Utah. The footage can be seen below.

On top of being able to apparently hold his own behind a mic, Dao is supposedly known to be a bit of a whiz at whipping up a meal after studying culinary arts in 2004 at Louisville’s Sullivan University, according to alum Katie Payne.

“He prepared some very authentic Vietnamese dishes and gave us some guidance on a couple more authentic dishes during class,” Payne, the chef for National Center for Hospitality Studies, shared with the Post.

A profile of Dao from an 2004 issue of the Sullivan pupil-written publication detailed him as being an “extraordinary” figure who beat the odds to make his cooking dreams a reality.

“Dr. David Dao is a familiar and friendly face to culinary students and staff,” the piece states, in part, “but very few know his extraordinary story.”

“Originally from Saigon City, Vietnam, Dr. Dao enrolled in Sullivan’s Culinary Arts program because he is passionate about food and preventing disease instead of always treating the symptoms. This is where his story begins.”

Chef Payne agreed with the positive past notations about Dao, but admittedly couldn’t remember much about the United passenger from their times away from the kitchen.

“As I recall he was into food,” she offered.

“I think he was a good cook [and] he seemed like he was well versed in authentic Vietnamese,” she concluded.

Dao last publicly spoke of his current ordeal with WLKY on Tuesday from his hospital bed, keeping things brief, but making his overall point as succinct as possible.

“Everything [hurts],” he was noted as saying.

Speaking further on his behalf, the doctor’s family thanked those who showed their support and concern after the United Airlines video went viral.

“Currently, they are focused only on Dr. Dao’s medical care and treatment,” his relatives said in a statement.

Coincidentally, even non-mainstream news publications, such as TMZ, have published reports on the United Airline’s passenger’s past. No word on why they’ve done so.

[Featured Image by Spencer Platt/Getty Images]

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