Donald trump immigration ban doesn't involve Muslim-majority countries where the billionaire conducts business.

Donald Trump Muslim-Country Immigration Ban Doesn’t Apply To Countries Where He Has Business Ties

Donald Trump followed through with one of his most controversial campaign promises on Friday; that’s when the former-reality TV star signed an executive order to ban immigration from largely-Muslim nations. The immigration ban signed by Trump indefinitely suspends immigration to the U.S. by Syrian refugees, and severely restricts the refugees and immigrants from other predominantly Muslim nations.

As CNN reports, the Donald Trump immigration ban has been entitled the “Protection Of The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States,” and it went into effect immediately. According to the Trump, the ban falls into the dubious category of “extreme immigrant vetting.”

While shocking to many, the Trump immigration ban is precisely what the Celebrity Apprentice star promised to do when he turned his attention from making prime time television shows to occupying the White House.

Shockingly and offensively, Donald Trump omitted a critical portion of his immigration ban from the finished product (the full text of which can be read here, courtesy of CNN). While Trump included a provision for Syrian “safe zones” in versions of his controversial executive order that made the rounds earlier this week, the finished product included nothing of the sort. This means that, per the Donald Trump immigration ban, Syrian citizens forced from their homes and livelihoods as a result of the civil war in the nation will no long have a place to relocate to. Not within their borders, and certainly not in the United States.

According to the controversial wording of the Trump immigration executive order, citizens of so-called “terror prone” nations are now (and were immediately) banned from entering the U.S. for a full three months. Potential immigrant refugees that would have fallen under the umbrella of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program are now banned for at least 120 days, or the point in which the Donald Trump cabinet deems that potential refugees have been “properly vetted.” And that provision applies “only for nationals of countries for whom” Donald Trump and his team believe come from countries that allow for proper vetting.

This means that if a potential refugee is from a country unapproved by the Trump Team, they may never be admitted to the United States under the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. At least not while Trump is in the White House.

Interestingly enough, however, the Donald Trump immigration ban does not apply to predominantly Muslim nations where Trump and the Trump Organization have “done business or pursued potential deals.”

As Bloomberg reports, while the Donald Trump immigration ban specifically targets seven “Muslim-majority” countries in the Middle East, it specifically omits additional neighboring Muslim-majority countries where Trump or his disputed organization own properties, do or have done business.

Included among Trump properties in the Middle East are luxury towers in Turkey, a predominantly Muslim nation that recently suffered an attempted military coup and which was, as The Washington Post reports, slammed by the U.N. over reports of egregious human rights abuses.

According to the U.N,. forces sanctioned by the government of Turkey may have intentionally shot civilians, destroyed their property, “carried out arbitrary arrests and triggered a wave of displacement in an ongoing military campaign against ethnic Kurdish separatists in the country’s southeast.”

Donald Trump and/or his organization also owns golf courses in the United Arab Emirates. According to Human Rights Watch, the Muslim-majority Middle Eastern nation has a history of human rights violations disturbing and pervasive enough to be noted.

“The United Arab Emirates (UAE) often uses its affluence to mask the government’s serious human rights problems. The government arbitrarily detains, and in some cases forcibly disappears, individuals who criticized the authorities, and its security forces face allegations of torturing detainees. A new anti-discrimination law further jeopardizes free speech and is discriminatory, as it excludes references to gender and sexuality.”

In fact, when it came to banning immigration from Muslim countries in the Middle East, Donald Trump didn’t seem to take into consideration how many Americans had been killed by immigrants from those nations at all. For instance, Saudi Arabian nationals have killed more American citizens between 1975 and 2015 than all other Middle Eastern nations combined. However, Saudi Arabia was not included in the Trump’s sweeping and controversial immigration ban, per the Cairo Institute.

As New York Daily News reports, Donald Trump registered eight companies with associations to his hotel business in Saudi Arabia just after he launched his successful presidential campaign in 2015. He did so using company names similar to company names he has utilized in other foreign nations: THC Jeddah Hotel, DT Jeddah Technical Services, and more.

Trump has even publicly shared his “admiration” for Saudi Arabian nationals as part of his campaigning process.

As the New York Times reports, the Trump immigration ban has already gone into effect, and for some, its instantaneous effects have been devastating. Travelers from the seven banned Middle Eastern, Muslim-majority countries have been stranded worldwide as the news broke that they could no longer reach their destinations in the United States.

Lawsuits have reportedly been filed, in some cases, on their behalf.

While the White House has sworn to the American people that the Trump executive order would protect “the United States from foreign nationals entering from countries compromised by terrorism,” some are finding that Trump’s America is not what they envisioned.

One thing’s for sure, though. The new Donald Trump immigration ban isn’t hitting the new president in the pocketbook or compromising his controversial, impeachment petition-inducing, possible conflict-of-interest business ties.

[Featured Image by Susan Walsh/AP Photo]

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