Zika Virus Hoax

Zika Hoax News: Poisonous Larvicide, Not Mosquitoes, Reportedly Behind Brain Deformations In ‘Vicious Profit Cycle’

The Zika virus isn’t the culprit behind brain deformations in children, this according to the latest news about reported outbreaks, particularly in South America. According to a GM Watch report, Brazilian and Argentinian doctors say a Zika hoax is in effect.

Reportedly, growing consensus among experts suggests the government-approved larvicide linked to the Monsanto Company is causing microcephaly. Even more alarmingly, experts say officials and representatives of the vaccine industry are perpetuating the hoax to continue making more of the chemical.

According to Natural News, the group of doctors is calling out Brazilian agencies for spreading a falsehood about the Zika virus. At the center of the controversy are mass fumigation strategies designed to mitigate the spread of Zika by mosquito carriers.

The main component is pyriproxyfen, an anti-larvae agent that is intended to interrupt the growth cycle of mosquitoes, as GM writes.

“Pyriproxyfen is a growth inhibitor of mosquito larvae, which alters the development process from larva to pupa to adult, thus generating malformations in developing mosquitoes and killing or disabling them.”

Data shows that the potent agent works against Zika by preventing larvae from developing into adults, which spread the virulent pathogen. Like other tried and true methods, fumigation is the first order of delivery.

A pest control agent uses a special apparatus to dispense airborne particles of the fumigant. In turn, it targets areas where mosquitoes and larvae proliferate. Unfortunately, pyriproxyfen is not target-specific.

Consequently, humans — namely poor and destitute Brazilian residents — are affected in the process of combating the disease at its source.

Doctors at the Red University of Environment and Health believe officials are being deceptive and using the virus as cover for the insidious side effects of the chemical agent.

“A dramatic increase of congenital malformations, especially microcephaly in newborns, was detected and quickly linked to the Zika virus by the Brazilian Ministry of Health.

“Malformations detected in thousands of children from pregnant women living in areas where the Brazilian state added pyriproxyfen to drinking water is not a coincidence, even though the Ministry of Health places a direct blame on Zika virus for this damage, while trying to ignore its responsibility and ruling out the hypothesis of direct and cumulative chemical damage caused by years of endocrine and immunological disruption of the affected population.

“Doctors from the Brazilian Association for Collective Health (ABRASCO) demand that urgent epidemiological studies taking into account this causal link be carried out, especially when among 3,893 cases of malformations confirmed until January 20, 2016, 49 children have died and only five of them were confirmed to have been infected with Zika.”

The study authors point out that long before the deployment of pyriproxyfen against the virus that causes Zika, as many as 75 percent of residents were infected. However, there were no reported cases of birth defects. And in a notable case of irony in Colombia, where there are many instances of Zika, there has not been one case of microcephaly linked to the condition.

So, why is the government adopting this narrative?

Skeptics say the government is passing blame on mosquitoes, a plausible culprit in the development of smaller brains and other birth defects. After all, the insects are unable to counter these allegations, and they stand accused. In short, the public soon embraces the cause-and-effect relationship, which provides a false sense of security. With little to go on, the government’s responsibility is ignored and dependence rises on its proposed eradication methods.

A demand for the pesticide rises, which bolsters production and substantiates the need for genetically modified mosquitoes. Profit serves as the primary driver and the cycle repeats. Natural News says it’s “the perfect business model.”

[Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images]

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