Auld Lang Syne: Lyrics and History

A new year means a sing along, and there’s a song especially for the occasion: Auld Lang Syne.

Auld Lang Syne is a Scottish poem written by Robert Burns in 1788. The sung version is the poem set to the tune of a traditional folk song. The song, translated either as old long since, or days gone by, spread through out the British Isles during the 18th century, and was taken overseas by immigrants and convicts. By the beginning on the 20th century it had become the default song sang on New Years Eve around the Anglosphere and among English speakers in Commonwealth (former British colones) countries.

If you’re in the US and partying tonight, he’s the Auld Lange Syne lyrics:

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind ?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and old times since ?

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll buy your pint cup !
And surely I’ll buy mine !
And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have run about the slopes,
and picked the daisies fine ;
But we’ve wandered many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine† ;
But seas between us broad have roared
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

And there’s a hand my trusty friend !
And give us a hand o’ thine !
And we’ll take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

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