Princess Diana Death: New Information To Be Examined By Police

Dan Evon - Author
By

Aug. 17 2013, Updated 1:49 p.m. ET

New information about the death of Princess Diana in 1997 will be investigated by British police.

London’s Metropolitan Police said that they received new information about the deaths of Princess Diana and Dodi al Fayed but they did not elaborate on the information or how it was obtained.

The police did say that they were “assessing its relevance and credibility.”

Sky News reports that the new information involves the Royal Military Police and Diana’s diary.

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Sky’s Crime Correspondent Martin Brunt said: “We understand this information includes an allegation that Princess Diana and Dodi al Fayed and the driver of their car were killed by a member of the British military. The information we’re told was passed to Scotland Yard quite recently. It also includes, we understand, references to something known as Diana’s diary.”

Fox News notes that a jury in 2008 ruled that Diana, the Princess of Wales, and Fayed were “unlawfully killed” due to the reckless pursuit of the paparazzi and the reckless driving of their chauffeur.

But several people, including Fayed’s father Mohammed, have long believed that Diana and Dodi were murdered. Operation Paget concluded in 2006 that there was no evidence of murder. The operation did conclude that the driver Paul had been drinking and was driving too fast.

Scotland Yard said that the new information regarding Princess Diana’s death did not come from Operation Paget. London’s police department also said that it was not re-opening the case. They are merely assessing the new information.

A statement reads: “This is not a re-investigation and does not come under Operation Paget.”

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