Postal Service Door To Door Delivery Cut Via USPS’ Postal Reform Act Of 2013

The postal service’s door to door delivery might be on the chopping black if lawmakers have their way.

As previously reported by The Inquisitr, along with the postal service’s door to door delivery, the five-day mail delivery plans are under review.

The USPS is losing $25 million a day and the Postal Reform Act of 2013 is intended as a solution. Only 28 percent of American addresses serviced by USPS require the postal service’s door to door delivery. The remaining 72 percent received either curbside mail delivery or centralized delivery, which is for apartments and condos.

Cutting the the postal service’s door to door delivery would save an estimated $4 billion per year. The cost of the postal service’s door to door delivery is said to be about $353 per delivery point per city, whereas other services cost about half or less.

Cutting the postal service’s door to door delivery would not happen all at once. The Postal Reform Act of 2013 would phase in the change to the postal service’s door to door delivery over 10 years. The postal service’s Saturday deliveries would still remain but “mail-like bills and advertisements” will have to wait until Monday to be delivered. Unfortunately, this is necessary because the USPS needs to save at least $4.5 billion per year in order to stop losing money.

The American Postal Workers Union is claiming the Postal Reform Act of 2013 would have a “devastating effect on the Postal Service and on postal employees.” But the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee insists that a “balanced approach to saving the Postal Service means allowing USPS to adapt to America’s changing use of mail.”

What do you think about plans to end the postal service’s door to door delivery?