FDA Moves To Seize Dietary Supplement From GNC Warehouses

In April, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning on the workout supplement DMAA (1,3-dimethylamylamine) – commonly branded under the names Jack3d and OxyElite Pro.

DMAA was initially patented as a nasal decongestant and later marketed as a dietary supplement. But questions arose as to the stimulant’s safety. The FDA alerted consumers to the potential health problems associated with taking the drug, telling people to avoid purchasing any product containing DMAA.

After receiving 86 reports, each addressing serious adverse effects – linking DMAA to psychiatric disorders, heart problems, nervous system disorders, and at least five deaths – the FDA deemed the supplement unsafe for human consumption.

The now illegal dietary ingredient was found to narrow blood vessels and arteries, which can elevate blood pressure, and possibly cause cardiovascular problems such as shortness of breath, arrhythmias, tightening in the chest, and heart attack, as well as seizures and other neurological and psychological conditions.

The New York Times reports that federal prosecutors have requested authorization from judges in two states, permitting them to seize more than 3,200 remaining cases of the controversial workout stimulant from warehouses operated by retailer GNC in Leetsdale, Pennsylvania and Anderson, South Carolina.

After the agency’s initial warning, the maker of Jack3d and OxyElite Pro ceased production. Some leading retailers voluntarily withdrew their remaining stock of the products from store shelves, but GNC continued to sell its inventory.

According to a complaint filed in Federal District Court in Pittsburgh, following an FDA inspection of GNC’s Leetsdale warehouse, officials notified GNC that the products were adulterated and being illegally held by the company. A similar complaint was filed in Federal District Court in Anderson.

Until the issue with the FDA is resolved, GNC states they do not intent to distribute the warehouse product – but will continue to sell off its remaining inventory currently in its stores.

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