Donald Trump Is Having Trouble Finding A Place To Live Due To His Toxic Brand, Report Suggests

The end of Donald Trump's tumultuous presidency has left him struggling to find a place to live, Raw Story reported.

The publication pointed to a Friday report from CNN that revealed Palm Beach, Florida, is reviewing whether Trump can legally make his Mar-a-Lago resort his permanent residence. In particular, the decision might violate conditions that were set in 1993 when he converted the private home into a club. One such condition is that he can only live on the property for a maximum of three weeks per year and no longer than seven consecutive days at a time.

"When Trump turned the private residence into a social club, he had agreed with the town to limit his stays at Mar-a-Lago, and now some Palm Beach residents say he is violating that agreement," CNN reported.

Palm Beach Town Manager Krik Blouin told the publication that the matter is currently being reviewed by the town's attorney, John "Skip" Randolph.

"Mr. Randolph is reviewing the Declaration of Use Agreement and our Code of Ordinances to determine if former President Trump can live at Mar-a-Lago."
Raw Story also pointed to former Deputy Assistant General Harry Litman's recent analysis of the situation on MSNBC.
"What it really shows is how toxic a figure President Trump has become in the entire country. He couldn't possibly live in New York, his old residence, and wherever he is, there's a bad odor."
The former president is not alone in his troubles, either. Former Vice President Mike Pence is reportedly staying with family and still does not have his own home, People reported. But while some have said Pence's living situation was akin to being "homeless" and "couch surfing," a local insider pushed back on these claims.

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump on stage after speaking to supporters at Joint Base Andrews before boarding Air Force One for his last time as President on January 20, 2021 in Joint Base Andrews, Maryland.
Getty Images | Pete Marovich

Elsewhere, other signs point to trouble for Trump's brand. Notably, Mark Cohen, a real estate broker with Brown Harris Stevens and former Trump Tower resident, said that the former U.S. leader's name is currently "radioactive." The purported damage to Trump's brand comes in the aftermath of his controversial presidency and the storming of the U.S. Capitol that followed one of his final public appearances as head of state.

Trump also lost lawyers representing him in the battle against Democratic Attorney General Letitia James' civil investigation, which is probing whether the businessman lied about his assets. If felonies are uncovered, the probe could turn into a criminal investigation.

Thus far, multiple law firms have cut ties with Trump amid the purported controversy linked to his brand.