Donald Trump Has Only Grown More Powerful Since Leaving W.H. And Impeachment Could Further Help, Reporter Says

Former President Donald Trump has grown more politically powerful since leaving the White House and could find even more strength through his upcoming impeachment trial, a reporter argued.

Politico reporter Tara Palmeri appeared on MSNBC on Friday, saying that Trump's political clout has grown since leaving the nation's capital and moving into his company's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. She noted that Republicans seem to be rallying together around the now-former president, with top congressional ally Matt Gaetz traveling to Wyoming to lead a rally against Liz Cheney for her vote to impeach him.

Palmeri noted that public sentiment was strongly with Trump and against Cheney at the rally, despite her deep political connections and previous popularity in the state.

"I actually went out of my way to try to find someone who would defend her and I really could not," she said, via Fox News.

"She didn't have that much name recognition, considering she's a Cheney... I mean, I said her name at a hardware store, and someone shouted a threat."
She added that supporters are still very much in Trump's corner, pushing back against any criticism. The reporter predicted that this could play to Trump's advantage as he prepares to face an unprecedented second impeachment trial, with the prospect that he could be barred from ever holding public office again with a conviction.

"Actually, the more he stays out of the media, the more that he becomes this martyr, this looming figure over the GOP," she said, adding that his base appears to be growing stronger.

"I think an impeachment would make him even more powerful — a conviction, is what I mean."
Trump continues to face backlash for the events leading up to the attack on the U.S. Capitol earlier this month, with many still blaming him for the remarks he delivered at a rally beforehand in which he implored supporters to be tough and reiterated unfounded claims that the election had been stolen from him. The impeachment that followed was the most bipartisan in United States history, with 10 members of the president's party joining Democrats in voting to impeach him.

Police stand near the U.S. Capitol.
Getty Images | Joe Raedle

Trump's impeachment trial is expected to start early next month, with some GOP members already signaling that they could vote to convict him.

As The Inquisitr reported, there have long been reports that Trump planned to return for another run at the White House in 2024, and some key allies have expressed support for another run. He has not yet announced any intention.