Former Prosecutor Expects More Damaging News For Donald Trump After Bombshell Report On Overturning Election

Not long after a bombshell report claimed that Donald Trump sought to oust his own acting attorney general as part of a plot to overturn election results in Georgia, a former prosecutor predicted that there could still be more damaging revelations to come.

A report from the New York Times (via The Hill) on Friday alleged that Trump had planned to oust then-acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and replace him with Jeffrey Clark, a lawyer at the Department of Justice and a fierce loyalist to the president. The newspaper claimed that Rosen had declined to back Trump's claims that the race had been stolen from him in Georgia, refusing to give in to Trump's pressure to appoint special counsels to investigate the allegations.

As the outlet noted, the plan fell apart when a number of top officials at the Department of Justice learned of Trump's plan and threatened to resign if he put it into motion.

Clark told the newspaper that the report was false, though The Hill wrote he did not specify which part of the account he believed was incorrect.

"Senior Justice Department lawyers, not uncommonly, provide legal advice to the White House as part of our duties," he said. "All my official communications were consistent with law."

The development came just ahead of Trump's impending impeachment trial, and one former federal prosecutor believes it could lead to more revelations about his behavior in the White House.

"The torrent of new information about his misconduct in the final weeks is just beginning," tweeted Preet Bharara, the former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York who was fired by Trump three months into her term in the White House. "It will not be possible to just move on. And conviction by the Senate is all the more important."

Trump faces what many believe will be a much more difficult trial than in his first impeachment, where he was acquitted in a vote that mostly went along party lines. This time, some Republicans indicating they could be open to voting to convict him, though none have yet said for certain how they would vote.

As The Inquisitr reported, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced on Friday that the opening arguments are set to begin the week of February 8. He came to an agreement with Republicans to delay the start of proceedings in order to give Trump time to put together a legal team.