Microsoft Creative Director Gone After ‘Always Online’ Controversy

Microsoft creative director Adam Orth no longer with the company

Microsoft creative director Adam Orth is no longer with the company following his controversial “always online” tweets.

The next Xbox, Xbox 720, Durango, or whatever you want to call it, has spawned rumors galore. One of those rumors which Microsoft is no longer commenting on until they officially reveal the console was the idea that the Xbox 720 would have an always online requirement. There was a public outcry following the rumor, to which Adam Orth, Microsoft’s former creative director, had tweeted, “Sorry, I don’t get the drama around having an ‘Always On’ console. Every device now is ‘always on’. That’s the world we live in. #dealwithit”.

As if that tweet wasn’t enough, Adam Orth had followed up with suggestions about everybody moving to big cities where the internet was better. Being a Seattle, Washington resident, he was obviously unaware that certain parts of certain states have unstable internet service, and when he was confronted with it, he basically asked why anyone would live there.

Microsoft answered the controversy with their own apology, saying that Adam Orth is “not a spokesperson” and his opinions do not reflect the company’s decisions. They added that if they had anything to tell the consumer, they would come out and say it directly and officially.

In a key point in the history of Microsoft, one of many that veteran gamers call “console wars“, Adam Orth’s comments on Twitter spawned many decisions to bring home a shiny new PlayStation 4 instead, using “deal with it” as a follow-up to the statement.

Sources say that Adam Orth is no longer with Microsoft, and gamers may see this as a positive and change their minds about the electronics company. Microsoft is most likely hoping those gamers jump back on board with the Xbox 720 at the time it launches, which will supposedly be announced at the end of May. Don’t quote us, though, as Microsoft is staying silent.

What do you think about Microsoft’s former creative director no longer being with the company?