Mark Meadows Won’t Last Long In Donald Trump’s White House, Says Associate

U.S. Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) speaks to members of the media as he arrives at the Rayburn House Office Building where former Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey testifies to the House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees on Capitol Hill December 07, 2018 in Washington, DC.
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North Carolina Rep. Mark Meadows was recently appointed as White House chief of staff after the abrupt ousting of Mick Mulvaney, and rumors are already circulating about his departure. As reported by Politico, an associate close to Donald Trump believes that the president’s volatile nature ultimately dooms all chiefs of staff.

“No matter who the chief of staff is, the president will eventually get sick and tired of that person,” the confidante said.

“It’s the natural slow death that begins from the moment that one walks in the door.”

According to Chris Whipple, the author of a book on the importance of the White House chief of staff, Meadows’ appointment is unlikely to change anything in the West Wing.

“The irony here is that Mulvaney is exactly the kind of chief of staff Trump wanted, who was a sycophant and was a lap dog, and there’s no indication that Meadows will be any different because that’s the way Trump operates,” he said.

“He has no use for a chief that will tell him hard truths so it’s really unlikely that anything will change.”

As reported by CBS News, Meadows, a member of the very conservative House Freedom Caucus, has become close with Trump in recent months. He was a vocal defender of the president during the impeachment probe and is expected to harness pro-Trump channels to the House and Senate when generating strategy. As noted by CNN, Meadows has strong relationships with both Republican and Democratic lawmakers — a quality that his predecessors reportedly lacked.

Meadows’ appointment comes as former adviser Hope Hicks is reported to be returning to the White House, which CNN notes has created the “sense” that new leadership is taking over. As reported by Politico, Meadows has close allies in the White House, although it’s unlikely he will shake up their positions with his new power amid the coronavirus and Trump’s re-election campaign. According to a senior administration official, Meadows has no plans to be a “revolutionary” or “disrupter.”

Meadows is the fourth chief of staff to take the helm. Before him was Reince Priebus, John Kelly, and Mulvaney, each of whom Politico reports took a different approach to deal with Trump’s unpredictable behavior.

As The Inquisitr previously reported, New Yorker magazine reporter Susan Glasser claimed that Trump’s decision to replace Mulvaney with Meadows is intended to distract from the outbreak of the coronavirus. Amid the crisis, Trump’s administration has faced heavy criticism for its response, which many believe was bungled.