Bernie Sanders Is The Only Candidate At Debate Saying The Person With The Most Delegates Should Be The Nominee

Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks to the crowd during the 2019 South Carolina Democratic Party State Convention on June 22, 2019 in Columbia, South Carolina.
Sean Rayford / Getty Images

During Wednesday’s Democratic presidential debate in Las Vegas, Nevada, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was the only person to say that the candidate who earns the most delegates at the end of the primary should be the nominee, even if they don’t win a majority.

“There’s a very good chance none of you are going to have enough delegates to the Democratic National Convention to clench this nomination, OK?” moderator Chuck Todd asked, per Breitbart.

Every candidate but Sanders expressed the belief that the person with the most delegates in such a situation should not automatically become the Democratic Party’s nominee.

“Whatever the rules of the Democratic Party are, they should be followed,” businessman Michael Bloomberg said.

Former Vice President Joe Biden, who has fallen from his previous frontrunner status, echoed Bloomberg.

“Play by the rule,” he said. “Let the process work its way out.”

As for Sanders, he suggested that nominating the person with the most delegates is the best way to ensure the nomination reflects the desires of the American people.

“Well, the process includes 500 super delegates on the second ballot. So I think that the will of the people should prevail, yes. The person who has the most votes should become the nominee.”

The 78-year-old politician took to Twitter after the debate to double down on his comments.

“Here’s a radical idea: The person with the most votes should be the Democratic nominee,” he tweeted.

Per The Hill, winning the Democratic nomination requires a majority of pledged delegates, which is 1,991. However, this number could be hard to reach this year due to a rule change that prevents superdelegates from voting on the first ballot at the Democratic National Convention.

As noted by HuffPost reporter Daniel Marans, Sanders could still lose the nomination even if he earns the most delegates. In this situation, Marans claims the Democratic Party would face disaster.

“It would make the Iowa caucus look like a success,” Marans said.

As The Inquisitr reported, the results of the Iowa caucuses were released this week and put Pete Buttigieg ahead of Sanders by 0.08 state delegate equivalents — less than one-hundredth of one percent. Overall, Buttigieg won 14 delegates, and Sanders won 12.

In response to the news, Sanders’ campaign requested a recount of the results, which Sanders senior adviser Jeff Weaver claims will result in a Sanders win.

As of now, The Associated Press reports that Buttigieg has won a total of 22 delegates while Sanders has won 21.