Justin Trudeau Hasn’t Fully Accepted That Iran Shot Down A Ukrainian Jet On Accident: ‘Need Better Answers’

The Canadian prime minister credited Iran for admitting responsibility, but made clear that there are still many questions with regard to how the incident really happened.

Justin Trudeau speaks
Pool / Getty Images

The Canadian prime minister credited Iran for admitting responsibility, but made clear that there are still many questions with regard to how the incident really happened.

Protests in Iran continue in the wake of the revelation that the downing of Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 was caused by an Iranian missile, killing all 176 passengers on board. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has seemingly expressed some level of doubt that the incident was an accident, as was claimed by the Iranian government.

According to The Daily Mail, Trudeau indicated during a Saturday news conference that the downing of the jet, which had 57 Canadian passengers on board, is “one of the issues that we certainly need better answers to,” before saying that he’s “outraged and furious” over the deadly incident.

In the immediate wake of the incident, the Iranian government denied that it was responsible for the crashed airliner, even going as far as criticizing the U.S. government and others for the accusation. But as evidence emerged in the following days, Iran admitted that they shot the plane down, calling it an accident and citing “human error.”

But when Trudeau was pressed on whether or not he believes Iran’s downing of the Kiev-bound jet was accidental, he made it clear that there’s still not a clear explanation as to why or how it happened.

“And that’s why this first step of admission of responsibility is an important one by Iran but there are many other questions like that one that will need clear answers to in the coming days and weeks,” Trudeau said.

Justin Trudeau places flowers on Parliament Hill during vigil for the victims who were killed in a plane crash in Iran.
  Dave Chan / Getty Images

Iran now claims that a person responsible for operating the missile defense system experienced a system malfunction that caused him or her to make a split-second decision on whether or not to fire, not knowing if it was an incoming cruise missile or something else.

The incident came on the same night that Iran launched a barrage of ballistic missiles at two Iraqi military bases, including Al Asad airbase, which both housed U.S. troops. Iran was likely under a high level of alert at the time, based on the presumption that the U.S. or coalition forces could have retaliated after the missile barrage.

As previously reported by The Inquisitr, the streets of Tehran — Iran’s capital city — were the scene of a growing number of protests, with angry Iranians chanting “death to liars” and “death to the dictator,” expressing their outrage over the initial government cover-up of the downed airliner.

The protesters even demanded the resignation of Iran Supreme Leader Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei. Riot police have already had numerous encounters with the angry protesters, firing tear gas and deploying water cannons against them in an attempt to quell the escalating situation.