Ruth Bader Ginsburg Responds To Donald Trump’s Request For Impeachment Interference

Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg and President Trump are not on the same page on impeachment.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks onstage at the Fourth Annual Berggruen Prize Gala celebrating 2019 Laureate Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg In New York City on December 16, 2019 in New York City.
Eugene Gologursky / Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg and President Trump are not on the same page on impeachment.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg responded on Monday to President Donald Trump’s proposal that the Supreme Court could stop the impeachment process, saying “the president is not a lawyer.”

“He’s not law-trained,” Ginsburg added after being asked by BBC reporter Razia Iqbal about Trump’s suggestion, CNN reported.

The 86-year-old justice pointed out that the Supreme Court only considers what is brought before the court and is not a proactive branch of government like the executive or legislative branches.

“But the truth is, the judiciary is a reactive institution. We don’t have a program, we don’t have an agenda. We react to what’s out there,” she continued.

Earlier this month, Trump questioned whether he and his Republican allies could ask the justices to put an end to the House impeachment inquiry.

“Great job! Radical Left has NO CASE,” Trump posted on Twitter on December 2. “Read the Transcripts. Shouldn’t even be allowed. Can we go to Supreme Court to stop?”

The Constitution states that the U.S. House of Representatives “shall have the sole Power of Impeachment” and the Senate “shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments.” It also states that “the Chief Justice shall preside” but offers no other role for the Supreme Court.

On Wednesday, the House of Representatives is expected to pass two articles of impeachment against Trump: abuse of office and obstruction of Congress. If the House votes by a simple majority to impeach Trump, the Senate will hold a trial, with Ginsburg’s colleague Chief Justice John Roberts serving as the judge.

Ginsburg’s remarks came at an event in New York, where she was awarded the Berggruen Institute Prize for Philosophy and Culture. She reportedly plans to donate the $1 million prize to several organizations that promote opportunities for women.

As reported earlier this month by The Inquisitr, Trump was granted a temporary victory in his ongoing efforts to shield his financial records from House Democrats by Ginsburg. She temporarily blocked a subpoena for Trump’s financial records issued by a lower court.

The stay granted by Ginsburg will hold the release of Trump’s records held by Deutsche Bank AG and Capital One after the president’s legal team requested that the records be blocked from release, arguing that the House Judiciary Committee and House Financial Services Committee lacked the authority to request and receive the records.

The Supreme Court is expected rule on the release of the Trump’s financial records in June, according to The New York Times. Some supporters of the president have complained that should the Supreme Court rule in favor of releasing the records, it could sink his chances for a second term given how close to the 2020 elections the ruling will occur.