Andrew Yang Says One Particular Piece Of Advice From Elon Musk Inspired His Presidential Run

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks during a forum on gun safety at the Iowa Events Center on August 10, 2019 in Des Moines, Iowa.
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Tech entrepreneur and Telsa CEO and founder Elon Musk threw his support for Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang on Saturday, as The Inquisitr reported. In a Twitter video post the same day, Yang revealed the one particular piece of advice Musk provided that at least partly pushed his presidential run.

“One thing he said that drove me, that has inspired me to this day — and I don’t know how good the advice is, but I know it’s correct,” he said. “He said that sometimes, when the — when the upside is high enough, you have to do it even if your chance of succeeding is very low.”

“And that actually is something that has motivated me, to do frankly things that are somewhat low likelihood,” he added.

Yang highlighted that he’s not sure how applicable Musk’s advice is to everyday situations, as it must be something you “care deeply about,” but nevertheless credited it with inspiring him.

The 44-year-old entrepreneur’s signature proposal is a universal basic income (UBI) of $1,000 per month for every American over the age of 18. The proposal stems from Yang’s belief that automation is shifting the economy and pushing an increasing number of Americans to the sidelines.

Musk has expressed his support for UBI in the past. According to CNBC, he believes that it’s likely a matter of time before automation makes UBI necessary.

“There is a pretty good chance we end up with a universal basic income, or something like that, due to automation,” Musk said, adding that he can’t think of another relevant solution outside of UBI.

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The 48-year-old entrepreneur’s company, Neuralink, seeks to combat the prospect of artificial intelligence leaving humans behind by creating technology that merges with human brains.

Per The Inquisitr, Musk aims to be able to implant internet-connected computers into human brains as early as next year. He believes the technology could help in the treatment of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Although Yang has received more media attention within the last week, RealClearPolitics reports that he’s still behind in the polls at 1.3 percent, tied with Tulsi Gabbard. However, NPR reports that he has made the fall debates in September and October and will take the stage alongside Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker, Pete Buttigieg, Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, and Beto O’Rourke.

Gabbard and Julian Castro have met the donor requirement and still need to gain two percent in four approved polls.