Kellyanne Conway Asks Jewish Reporter ‘What’s Your Ethnicity?’ Twitter Says She’s Going ‘Full Nazi In Public’

Kellyanne Conway had a bizarre moment at a press briefing Tuesday morning when she asked a reporter to state his ethnic background.

Kellyanne Conway addresses the media.
Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Kellyanne Conway had a bizarre moment at a press briefing Tuesday morning when she asked a reporter to state his ethnic background.

Donald Trump’s White House Counselor and frequent public spokesperson Kellyanne Conway on Tuesday was asked a question by a reporter about Trump’s comments telling four first-year congressional reps to “go back” to their own countries — even though all four are Americans. Conway responded by challenging the reporter about his own background, as MediaIte reported. The reporter, Andrew Feinberg of Breakfast Media, is Jewish.

Feinberg asked Conway, “which countries was (Trump) referring to?”

But rather than answering the question, Conway directed a personal question back at Feinberg.

“What’s your ethnicity?” Conway shot back, as quoted by Feinberg on his Twitter feed.

But Feinberg replied that his ethnicity was “not relevant.”

“It’s relevant because [Trump] said ‘originally from’…” Conway replied, according to Feinberg.

Twitter users quickly noted the overtones to Conway’s quizzing a Jewish reporter on his “ethnicity,” referring back to the history of Nazi Germany in which Jews were required to identify themselves as Jewish — sometimes being forced to wear yellow Star of David patches on their coats, as History.com recounts — in order to make it easier for Nazis to single them out for persecution and ultimately, death.

You almost have to admire the sheer b***s it takes to go full Nazi in public,” noted one Twitter user. “Almost.”

Another Twitter user remarked, “Well folks… here it is. Next come the arm bands,” a reference to the distinctive swastika arm bands worn by German Nazis.

Even as Conway responded to a question about Trump’s remarks which as The Inquisitr reported, have been widely condemned as “racist,” by questioning a Jewish reporter’s “ethnicity,” Trump attempted to defend himself from the accusations of racism.

“I don’t have a Racist bone in my body!” Trump wrote on his Twitter account (capitalization original). And prior to Conway asking her question of a Jewish reporter, Trump accused the four congressional Democratic women of being “Anti-Semitic,” also via Twitter, as well as “Anti-Israel.”

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Trump himself has been accused of making anti-Semitic remarks. Last year, he told a group of Jewish supporters that he believed they were more loyal to Israel than to the United States, according to the Jewish news magazine Forward.

“Trump’s view of American Jews betrays his narrow, ethno-nationalist view of the world,” wrote Forward editor Batya Ungar-Sargon. “If you believe that at its core, a nation’s identity stems from that of its ethnic majority, you will view America as a white, Christian country.”

Richard Nixon speaks.
President Richard Nixon, who was recorded on tape calling Jews ‘disloyal,’ and ‘born spies.’ Hulton Archive / Getty Images

But previous American presidents have also made anti-Semitic remarks, questioning the loyalty of American Jews. President Richard Nixon was was recorded on tape saying “Most Jews are disloyal,” as the Israeli newspaper Haaretz recounted.

The tapes also captured Nixon making such anti-Semitic remarks as, “You can’t trust the bast***s. They turn on you,” and calling Jews, “born spies,” Haaretz noted.