Harry & Meghan Help Save An Elephant In Newly Released Instagram Pics

Prince Harry laughs with Meghan Markle
John Phillips / Getty Images

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are wasting no time putting their new Instagram account, @SussexRoyal, to use. The couple has just released five new pictures in honor of the Duke of Sussex’s work with the African Parks Network.

The pictures seem to be a concentrated effort to bring more attention to the royals’ support of environmental preservation. Yesterday, Prince Harry and his brother William attended the Our Planet premiere at The National History Museum in London. The nature documentary, narrated by eco-warrior David Attenborough, is currently available on Netflix.

The caption for the Instagram collection elaborated on the royals’ focus on wildlife.

“The Duke of Sussex continues to advocate for the communities and wildlife that coexist in some of the most vulnerable environments around the world.”

The message made sure to include not only statements about wildlife itself but also the impact of its destruction on local communities.

“Be it human wildlife conflict or natural disasters, these communities (park rangers, school children, families) are on the frontline of conservation and we must do more to help them as we also work to safeguard the animals and landscapes that are in critical danger.”

Accompanying the caption was some information about the duke’s work with elephant preservation, specifically Elephants Without Borders.

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The Duke of Sussex attends the ‘Our Planet’ premiere at the Natural History Museum with The Prince of Wales and The Duke of Cambridge, lending their joint support for the protection of our environment. As president of @africanparksnetwork, The Duke of Sussex continues to advocate for the communities and wildlife that coexist in some of the most vulnerable environments around the world. Be it human wildlife conflict or natural disasters, these communities (park rangers, school children, families) are on the frontline of conservation and we must do more to help them as we also work to safeguard the animals and landscapes that are in critical danger. A few recent photos that look back on: Prince Harry’s long time commitment to this cause as well as a glimpse into the work he and The Duchess of Sussex did in 2017. Their Royal Highnesses travelled to Botswana to assist Dr. Mike Chase of Elephants Without Borders in equipping a bull elephant with a satellite collar. Approximately 100 elephants are poached/killed every day for their ivory tusks. Using satellite technology allows conservationists to track their critical migratory patterns and to protect them and the local communities from human wildlife conflict. The elephant pictured was sedated for just 10 minutes before he was up and back with his herd. Tracking his movements has allowed conservationists to better protect him and other elephants and ensure heightened protection for these beautiful creatures moving forward. Credit: Image 1 PA

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The caption explained that around 100 elephants are killed each day by mercenary ivory traders. The trade has long been a problem, and Prince William even explored the idea of destroying all ivory items in the Royal Collection in a bid to lower its prestige, per The Guardian.

Conservationists are attacking the problem of poaching by using technology, specifically tracking collars, to protect both local communities and the elephants themselves from danger.

In the fourth picture posted, Meghan Markle is seen helping Harry place a tracking collar a sedated elephant, thus helping protect its future. The two traveled to Botswana in 2017 in what many saw as a pre-engagement trip.

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Saving elephants has been a particular focus for both brothers. Prince William has spoken about his fear that the species might soon face extinction, leaving his children in a world without the beautiful creatures.

He lamented that if poaching continues at its current pace, elephants could be gone from the wild by the time his daughter, Princess Charlotte, turns 25-years-old, per the International Business Times.

“I’m not prepared to be part of a generation that lets these iconic species disappear and have to explain to our children why we lost this battle when we had the tools to win it.”

Prince Harry himself is soon going to be a father; he and his wife Meghan are expecting their first child later this month.