Trump Tells Sean Hannity Wind Power Can’t Work Because Wind ‘Only Blows Sometimes’

Twitter weighed in hilariously on the president's wind comments.

Donald Trump at a rally.
Scott Olson / Getty Images

Twitter weighed in hilariously on the president's wind comments.

In addition to his campaign rally in Michigan Thursday night, President Donald Trump spoke with Fox News host Sean Hannity, sharing his thoughts on the feasibility of wind power as an alternative fuel source.

According to a report from HuffPost, Trump opined that wind energy can’t work because wind “only blows sometimes.” The president supplemented his comments to Hannity with more on the topic during his rambling speech to supporters in Michigan, suggesting that if your house was running on wind energy, anytime there was no wind you’d be out of luck.

“If Hillary got in, you’d be doing wind,” he told supporters at the Michigan rally Thursday night. “Wheeeee! If it doesn’t blow, you can forget about television for that night. ‘Darling, I want to watch television.’ ‘I’m sorry! The wind isn’t blowing.’ I know a lot about wind.”

Twitter had a field day with the president’s comments, with some posting embarrassing pictures of Trump’s combover blowing awkwardly, exposing his scalp beneath. Others turned to “hot air” jokes. CNN chose to run a segment on the president’s wind power comments with co-host John Berman referring to “breaking wind news,” and cracking up his co-host Alisyn Camerota in the process.

As far as the notion that wind power only works when it is actually windy outside, the Department of Energy explains that although “the wind does not always blow and the sun doesn’t always shine,” both wind energy and solar energy can be stored in batteries for later use.

Trump went on to extol the virtues of petroleum-based fuel in an aside that nonetheless kept the audience rapt with attention with frequent breaks for applause.

Trump supporter in Michigan.
  Scott Olson / Getty Images

“It’s what we have done with energy and oil and gas,” Trump said. “That’s all competition from, for Russia. You look at the Ukraine. You look at so many different levels. You look at our military.”

Other people, however, found Trump’s comments to be not only not that funny, but actually frightening. Michael Mann, professor of atmospheric science at Pennsylvania State University, called Trump a “dangerous clown” who would gladly sacrifice our children’s and grandchildren’s futures if it would benefit the “fossil fuel interests whose bidding he’s doing.”

Still, other Twitter users pointed out that wind and solar power are actually ascendant industries in Michigan, the very state where Trump was speaking. NBC‘s Jonathan Allen tweeted out a link to a local news story from WKAR that highlights the efforts of Michigan residents who support a move from coal to wind and solar power, pointing out how it is “overwhelmingly popular” and is also creating jobs.

But Trump’s distaste for wind goes way back. He fought the construction of a Scottish wind farm that was within view of his Aberdeen golf course for years and was finally ordered to pay the Scottish government’s legal costs for fighting the suit.

“When I look out of my window and I see these windmills, it offends me,” Trump said at the time, according to BBC News.