Car Buff Jerry Seinfeld Accused Of Selling A Fake Vintage Porsche For $1.5 Million, Then Stiffing The Buyer

Jerry Seinfeld appears at a movie premiere
Cindy Ord / Getty Images for Red State Blue State

Jerry Seinfeld is facing a lawsuit claiming that he auctioned off a vintage Porsche for $1.5 million — all while knowing that the car was not authentic.

As the New York Post reported, the comedian is being sued by Fica Frio Ltd. after the company purchased a 1958 Porsche Carrera Speedster that they claim Seinfeld “misrepresented.” Seinfeld reportedly left a voicemail to the company promising to make things right, but then they never heard from him again.

The lawsuit claims that Seinfeld initially agree to refund the price the company paid at auction, but then reneged on the deal.

“Mr. Seinfeld breached that oral agreement, as he has not returned Fica Frio’s purchase price nor paid to Fico Frio its costs incurred, in exchange for the vehicle,” the lawsuit stated.

As the report noted, auction documents for the Porsche claimed it had “the distinction of being the only Carrera Speedster known to have been finished at the factory in Auratium Green” and was one of only 56 Carrera Speedsters “specified in GS/GT trim.”

It was not clear from the report which of the claims were in dispute, or what the true value of the Porsche might have been. Seinfeld’s lawyer said the car was transferred to the auction company, which oversaw its sale at an auction.

Jerry Seinfeld is known for his love of classic cars and even created his own talk show centered around showing them off, Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee. The show features Seinfeld interviewing his friends from the world of comedy along with other celebrities. President Barack Obama even appeared on one episode, which Seinfeld said was one of the most frightening moments of his life.

“It was absolute, sickening nerves. It seemed like a once in a lifetime opportunity, that I’m gonna get to be funny with a president in the White House,” he told Vulture, comparing the nerves he felt to the first time he performed on the Tonight Show.

The talk show allowed Seinfeld to show off some of the favorite cars from his extensive collection.

Jerry Seinfeld’s lawyer told the New York Post that they were working in good faith to resolve the matter, but said the company ignored Jerry’s attempts and instead filed the lawsuit.

“He has asked Fica Frio for evidence to substantiate the allegations. Fica Frio ignored Jerry and instead filed this frivolous lawsuit,” Jerry Seinfeld’s attorney, Orin Snyder, said in a statement, via the Daily Herald.