Baby Trump Balloons Return, This Time In Chicago For ‘March On The Polls’

A smaller version of the famous baby Trump balloon.
Presley Ann / Getty Images

The massive orange blimp in the sky bearing a stark resemblance to the current President of the United States made a return recently, flying over the “March on the Polls” event held in Chicago earlier today, USA Today details. The baby Trump balloon — most famous for first having flown over London, U.K., in protest of Donald Trump’s visit to the British capital — is about 20 feet in length. Holding a cell phone and wearing nothing but a twisted expression and a pair of diapers, the satirical balloon has made headlines across the world since first appearing overseas, as CNN previously reported.

Beneath the large inflatable, marchers were also able to purchase tiny, miniaturized versions of the golden baby Trump. At $10 per unit, the funds were ostensibly used to help offset the material cost of the march, at least according to Jenn Galdes — a volunteer with the march who initially pitched the idea to the organizers. Galdes elaborated further on the comedic nature of the silly looking balloons, and on some of the reasons that rally goers had to purchase their own smaller versions.

“I heard one woman say to her daughter: ‘Yes you can buy one. Then I’m going to take it home and I’m going to punch it, and then I’m going to poke it and then I’m going to throw it in the trash.'”

Galdes claims that there has been a half-dozen of the larger Trump blimps ordered by organizers, with the plan being to distribute them nationwide to key points of protest against the current administration in advance of the looming November midterms. As The Hill relays, the larger iteration of the baby Trump balloon has already flown over Washington state in response to a visit from Vice President Mike Pence, with other balloons having been sent to New Jersey and California.

The “March on the Polls” event was put together by organizers attempting to register new voters, particularly young voters as well as those who identify as coming from minority communities. On site, there was a parade of first-time voters as well as a “Voter Village” staffed with seasoned politicos ready to ensure that registration was up to date and that potential voters well aware of their electoral rights and responsibilities.

Event coordinator Jessica Scheller, speaking with reporters, made it evident that the raison d’etre for the event was one of building electoral awareness and infrastructure in resistance to the politics of the current administration.

“People are excited… These marches build a sense of community, so if you’ve been feeling disengaged, disenfranchised or disappointed by the way our government has been operating, we encourage you to come out and join us.”