Brexit War Seeping Into Social Media With Not-So-Subtle Jabs

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Brexit is quickly becoming a problem for the United Kingdom, who just last week had UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s plan for the exit from the European Union. The deadline for an agreement to be reached is in March 2019, with the UK set to exit on March 29.

As reported by CNN, the UK is having an increasingly difficult time reaching a favorable agreement before their exit next year, and the debate is now spilling over into snarky comments on social media.

European Council President Donald Tusk took to social media with a photo of May and himself, and the caption has resulted in Britain’s Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt “urging European Union leaders to get the ‘tone’ right in their negotiations with the UK over Brexit.”

The image showed Tusk and May choosing pieces of cake from a cake stand, and the council president had captioned the image, “A piece of cake, perhaps? Sorry, no cherries.”

The comment comes as the EU has repeatedly accused the UK of “wanting to have its cake and eat it,” and of “cherry-picking as it seeks to keep elements of the single market it likes and ditch others it doesn’t.”

“If we are going to work seriously towards a solution then we need to avoid revving up the situation and making it worse by appealing to audiences on social media,” Hunt said.

May had a disastrous summit last week during negotiations, as the Inquisitr previously reported, and the prime minister said on Friday that “negotiations with the EU were at an impasse” after her plans seemed to have been rejected. She requested that the EU “respect the British position and the result of the June 2016 referendum.”

“Throughout this process, I have treated the EU with nothing but respect. The UK expects the same. A good relationship at the end of this process depends on it,” May said.

When she returned from the summit, she asked that the exact objections to her plan be laid out so that she would be able to formulate a better, more agreeable plan in due course. Despite their differences, May stated that Britain wants to resolve the issues to come to an agreement before the deadline.

Meanwhile, French President Emmanuel Macron blasted Brexit, stating that the entire process was “sold to the British people by ‘liars’ who immediately fled the stage, unwilling to see their project through.”

Hunt replaced Brexit champion Boris Johnson after he decided he could not support May in her plan for the process. He has cautioned against trying to capitalize on Britain’s exit.

“What Theresa May is saying is: don’t mistake British politeness for weakness. If you put us in a difficult corner, we will stand our ground. That’s the kind of country we are.”