Trump Continues Attacks On Bob Woodward, Promises ‘Real Book’

The president is displeased with Woodward's book 'Fear.'

President Donald Trump Leaves a meeting at the White House
Mark Wilson / Getty Images

The president is displeased with Woodward's book 'Fear.'

In an early Monday morning tweet, Donald Trump said that he will write the “real book” about his presidency, continuing on with his attacks on author Bob Woodward and his latest book Fear, reports the Washington Post.

While the book has not yet been released, Trump has been attacking the forthcoming release through the last week after some early parts of the book had been released. Trump’s favorite criticism of the book is that it is “fiction,” as previously reported by the Inquisitr.

For Woodward’s part, he has consistently stood behind his book, which includes a claim that aides are at times working against the president, something backed up by the recent New York Times op-ed. Woodward’s experience is clear, having done most of the reporting around the Watergate scandal alongside colleague Carl Bernstein at the Washington Post.

Trump’s tweet went to a few of his favorite criticisms, calling Woodward a “joke” and stating that “Dems can’t stand losing” while adding in a few tidbits of information, including that people had come forward and said they didn’t say what Woodward claims they did. This has led Trump to declare the book “fiction,” something that he has been doing ever since the initial excerpts were published.

That Trump would write a book is hardly news, having published 18 books already in his career, starting with his infamous 1987 book Trump: The Art of the Deal. Although Trump mostly writes with a ghostwriter, with just four not listing a ghostwriter, two of those were co-written with Robert Kiyosaki.

Adding to Trump’s history of book writing is the history of presidential autobiographies, dating back to the 1866 release of James Buchanan’s Mr. Buchanan’s Administration on the Eve of Rebellion and becoming especially popular recently, with every president, except for those that died in office, since Calvin Coolidge releasing a book about their time in the presidency with Barack Obama having signed a $65 million deal for his addition to the legacy, reported Newsweek.

Woodward defended his book on the Today show on NBC last week following denials of quotes attributed to the White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly and Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis.

“They are not telling the truth, these are political statements to protect their jobs, totally understandable,” said Woodward.

Trump has gone to great lengths to portray his White House as running well, tweeting on Monday morning that the White House is a “smooth running machine” while promoting his successes in his term.