Iran Sanctions To Be Reinstated Tuesday Just After Midnight

Trump Imposed New Tariffs On Iran, Prompting Protests Of Supreme Leader.
Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader / AP Images

Economic sanctions will be reimposed on Iran by the United States, taking effect on Tuesday, August 7. According to Reuters, senior U.S. administration officials expect the sanctions to have significant impact on the Iranian economy. Since April the rial, Iran’s currency, has lost half of its value. The current round of sanctions will focus on metal trading, coal, industrial software and the nation’s auto sector. There will also be a focus on Iran’s purchase of the United States dollar.

U.S. officials have stated that the sanctions are aimed at changing the behavior of the country in the social and economic sectors, not to bring about regime change. The goal of the sanctions is to cut off Iranian leadership’s access to resources. The current round of sanctions were originally lifted in 2015 as part of a deal between Iran and world leaders to curb the country’s nuclear program. In May of this year, President Donald Trump stated his intent to withdraw the U.S. from the Iran nuclear deal.

Iran’s continued growth in military power and political influence in the middle east, coupled with the pursuit of nuclear capabilities, has caused tensions with the United States for decades. However, U.S. officials have also said the president is willing to meet with Iran to create a new deal. The door to exemptions for the sanctions has been left tentatively open, with the administration stating it would be decided on a case-by-case basis.

The European Union has expressed concern and regret about the sanctions. Members of the E.U. have introduced their own measure, known as the blocking statute, that will also go into effect on Tuesday. They hope their efforts will mitigate the impact of the United States’ sanctions on Iran. The foreign ministers of France, Britain and Germany released a joint statement with the E.U.

“We deeply regret the re-imposition of sanctions by the U.S.”

As The Inquisitr previously reported, the collapse of the rial currency has lead to sporadic protests in Tehran and several other Iranian cities. One U.S. official expressed concern with reports of violence against protesters to Reuters, stating “The United States supports the Iranian people’s right to peacefully protest against corruption and oppression without fear of reprisal.” Footage has been obtained by Reuters showing marching in central Tehran and protesters chanting “Death to the dictator,” referring to supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

More sanctions are expected to come in November, this time targeting Iranian oil.