‘I Wait To Be Called,’ Sean Spicer Says Of His Relationship With President Donald Trump On ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live’

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“I do not call him, I wait to be called,” former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said to Jimmy Kimmel of his current relationship with President Trump, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Spicer was on the show to chat about his memoir on his time in the White House, titled The Briefing: Politics, The Press, and The President.

When Kimmel asked, “Which is more important, loyalty or the truth?” Spicer responded with “I don’t think you have to choose one or the other.”

“I had become the story too often,” Spicer said of why he ultimately resigned. “That’s not a good place for a spokesperson to be. I knew it wasn’t getting better and I wanted to make sure that I was ready because at some point I knew the end was coming, and I knew it was sooner than later.”

He listed his parents and wife as his biggest supporters while he held his position in the White House.

The Jimmy Kimmel interview is just one of a string of interesting events connected with Spicer’s book promotion, including a report that he once used the n-word to address a black classmate, the Inquisitr reports. A publicist for Regentry Publishing, Lauren McCue, says that Spice “can’t recall” using that word while he was a student at the Rhode Island Portsmouth Abbey School.

His ex-classmate reportedly confronted him at the book signing in Middletown last Friday. Alex Lombard of Cambridge, Massachusetts, accused Spicer in public of once using the racial slur against him when they were both prep school students. Lombard was led away by a security guard shortly after.

McCue issued a statement later that said Spicer was “taken aback” by the “outrageous claim” his ex-classmate made.

Spicer also gave an interview to the Washington Post about the book and said that he was “honored” to serve as a press secretary under Trump although he has “no desire to do that again.”

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He claimed that Trump acts like a salesman in public office to explain his harsh public demeanor. Spicer also claims that Trump “constantly feels under attack” and is never given credit for his achievements in office. He added that Trump doesn’t care how he is expected to act as a public official; he is going to do it his way.

He also referred to the research that Trump has made 3,200 false or misleading statements as president as an “exaggerated hyperbole.”