Ted Bundy’s Attorney Says The Infamous Serial Killer Was ‘Born Evil’ And Had A ‘Death Wish’

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Ted Bundy’s defense attorney John Henry Browne opens up about his experience counseling one of America’s most infamous serial killers.

After repeatedly proclaiming his innocence, Bundy admitted to murdering at least 30 women in the ’70s shortly before his execution in 1989. Investigators believe the victim count could be significantly higher.

The Oxygen’s series In Defense Of is a true crime docuseries that airs next week, which shares the experiences of lawyers who defended particularly notorious criminals.

“Ted was the only person in my 40 years of being a lawyer that I would say that he was absolutely born evil,” Browne told Fox News.

The 71-year-old attorney knew Bundy for more than a decade and has rare insight into the mind of the former law student turned serial killer.

Browne explains how Bundy stood out from the numerous clients his represented, noting his cunning nature.

“This is really the only person, after representing thousands of clients in 40 years that I would say that about. I didn’t want to believe people were born evil, but I came to the conclusion that Ted was… He had this energy about him that was clearly deceptive, very sociopathic.”

Reports at the time stated that Bundy was described as good looking and charismatic by young women who were lucky enough to survive an encounter with the serial killer who raped the deceased bodies of his victims.

Browne confirmed that Bundy was charismatic enough to come across as believable to the experienced criminal lawyer although he wasn’t sold on the act.

“I got that feeling right away when I first met him. He was manipulative, he was dishonest. But at the same time, he was… basically, a really good version of a used car salesman. He seemed very believable. But my intuitive side said ‘No, he’s not telling the truth about a lot of this.'”

The attorney said that Bundy once admitted that he was evil by nature as he once got emotional about his desire to be a good person.

Browne also believes that Bundy had a death wish due to turning down a plea bargain and enquiring and eventually going to a state where the death penalty will be more likely after a daring escape.

While on trial in Colorado, Bundy escaped from prison twice and committed at least three more murders before his ultimate recapture in Florida.

In his last interview the day before his execution, Bundy seemingly changed his mind about the death wish. The serial killer admitted that he was afraid to die when speaking to Dr. James Dobson.