Kathleen Dehmlow’s Family Writes Unflattering Obituary Saying Minnesota Woman ‘Will Not Be Missed’

'She passed away on May 31, 2018 in Springfield and will now face judgement.'

a minnesota woman's obituary took a turn
underverse / Shutterstock

'She passed away on May 31, 2018 in Springfield and will now face judgement.'

Kathleen Dehmlow was, apparently, not very well-loved by her family. The Minnesota woman died May 31, and if her obituary is any indication, very few people are sad to see her gone.

As USA Today reports, Ms. Dehmlow’s obituary, published in the Redwood Falls Gazette, starts off the way most of these things do: biographical information about where she was born, marriages and children, that sort of thing. But then things take a turn. It starts with the obituary writer airing some family dirty laundry.

“In 1962 she became pregnant by her husband’s brother.”

The family drama continues.

“She abandoned her children, Gina and Jay.”

And where most obituaries can be expected to offer platitudes like the deceased “went to be with the Lord” or something similar, the writer took a different approach.

“She passed away on May 31, 2018… and will now face judgement.”

And in one last dig, the writer rejected the usual honors and instead went straight for the gut.

“She will not be missed by Gina and Jay, and they understand that this world is a better place without her.”

And to drive the point home, the writer used a most unflattering picture of the deceased lady.

As it turns out, apparently Legacy.com, the website that hosts online obituaries for most American newspapers, found Ms. Dehmlow’s obituary in poor taste: it appears to have been removed from the website.

The Minnesota woman is not the first person to be “eulogized” in an unflattering obituary. As KHOU-TV (Houston) reported in 2017, the obituary for Leslie Ray Charping, or Galveston, was similarly less than flattering.

“[Charping’s life was] 29 years longer than expected and much longer than he deserved.”

The biting obituary then goes on to point out the “highlights” of his life, such as joining the Navy not out of patriotism but out of a plea deal to avoid jail; his lifelong love of the bottle; and his fondness for get-rich-quick schemes, among other character flaws. The missive then describes the “victims” who were relieved that the “horse’s a**” was finally gone.

“Evil does in fact die.”

Not all obituaries that make the news are written from a place of spite, however. As funeral planner Gail Rubin wrote on her blog, Terry Wayne Ward, of Indiana, was not only well-loved, but went to The Great Beyond with his tongue planted firmly in his cheek.

“Terry Wayne Ward, age 71, of DeMotte, IN, escaped this mortal realm on Tuesday, January 23rd, 2018, leaving behind 32 jars of Miracle Whip, 17 boxes of Hamburger Helper and multitudes of other random items that would prove helpful in the event of a zombie apocalypse.”

As of this writing, it is not clear who wrote Ms. Dehmlow’s obituary.