Omarosa May Have Taped White House Meetings — Her ‘Track Record’ Linked To Cell Phone Ban In West Wing

Omarosa may have secretly recored White House meetings, and is now attempting to use what she recorded for profit.

Chris Pizzello / AP Images

Omarosa may have secretly recored White House meetings, and is now attempting to use what she recorded for profit.

Trump called Omarosa a “good person” upon her exit from the White House, and all his administration can do now is hope she lives up to his critique when it comes to the aftermath of her departure. Concerns that she may have secretly taped White House meetings have come up today after she’s been taking meetings with some high-profile lawyers who have represented celebrities like Harvey Weinstein and Bill Cosby, according to Fox News.

Omarosa, who usually goes by her first name only, experienced an abrupt ending to her career in the White House last month, and she made promises to share a story about her time spent at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. She’s met with Lisa Bloom, who was Weinstein’s lawyer at one point, and she’s met with Monique Pressley, who once represented Cosby.

Omarosa Manigault-Stallworth is her full name and reports last month deemed her exit from the White House as anything but smooth. She jumped on those reports calling them false and calling on anyone making such a claim to show a video or taped conversation to prove those reports.

“Everyone knows Omarosa loves to record people and meetings using the voice notes app on her iPhone,” acquaintances of Omarosa said, and worries have bubbled up that she may have done just that while privy to White House meetings.

Did she record the moments in which she learned she was terminated from her White House position? According to Fox News, Omarosa was taken into the White House Situation Room to be given the boot, which is a room located under the West Wing. You must surrender all your electronic devices at the door when entering the Situation Room, so she shouldn’t have had any device that would record that conversation.

Omarosa
  Evan Agostini / AP Images

On her way out the White House door, Omarosa said she had “quite the story to tell” and she believed the story she wants to share about the time she spent in the Trump administration is a story “the world will want to hear,” reported the Chicago Tribune at the time of her departure.

News broke out regarding Omarosa’s exit from the White House and it sounded as if she didn’t go quietly. Rumors swirled that Omarosa was dragged out of the White House by the Secret Service. The Secret Service said the only involvement they had with Omarosa leaving was to deactivate her card, the one that gave her access to the White House.

Omarosa with mouth wide open
  Lee Roth / AP Images

That “deactivation” timeline raised even more questions because, at the time, it was reported that Omarosa’s final day wasn’t until a few weeks later, yet her credentials were deactivated via the Secret Service that day the report of her exiting the White House emerged.

The recent ban on personal cell phones in the West Wing was put in place after Michael Wolff’s tell-all book came out. But the New York Daily News reports that the recent ban “was related to Manigault-Newman’s track record of recording conversations.”