Polish Fruit-Picker? Twitter Offers Nigel Farage Job Suggestions As Bremain Camp Leads Brexit

brexit bremain

Nigel Farage appeared to admit defeat in the Bremain vs. Brexit poll in the last hour, reports Daily Star.

The Brexit campaigner considered data collated by Vote Leave and said that it looks like “Remain will edge it.”

“It’s been an extraordinary referendum campaign, turnout looks to be exceptionally high and looks like Remain will edge it.”

The value of the pound has surged as the likelihood of a Britain Remain victory becomes more certain. YouGov’s latest poll shows a 52-48 win for Remain.

Farage declared that he and the Brexit camp will triumph in the end and Britain will get its “borders back.” Farage admitted that he may lose the Brexit battle in 2016, but asserted that he and his supporters will ultimately win the war.

“Win or lose this battle, we will win this war, we will get this country back, we will get our independence back and we will get our borders back.”

Farage said he and his party, UKIP, are not going anywhere.

“UKIP and I are going nowhere and the party will only continue to grow stronger in the future.”

Farage has certainly vowed to battle on, but gleeful Bremain supporters are already suggesting new jobs for the UKIP leader, and #SuggestAJobForFarage started trending on Twitter as data came in suggesting that Brexit had been bested.

A popular suggestion was that Farage himself ought to leave Britain and get a taste of the life of a seasonal worker in a country like Poland or Romania. One Tweeter wrote that Farage ought to try working as “seasonal fruit picker in Poland.” Another suggested “Romanian social worker.”

Some used much stronger imagery — one Tweeter suggested, in a spirit of refugee solidarity, that Nigel Farage’s body ought to be hollowed out, and the husk used as affordable housing for refugee families.

Others accepted the possibility that Nigel Farage could remain in Britain, but hoped that he could make himself useful as a Diversity Officer.

Many people pointed out that, by his own reckoning, the defeated Farage may now be in trouble. The UKIP boss and his party take the stance that immigrants are pinching the jobs in Britain and that’s why “there are no jobs.”

One Tweeter reflected that the right-wingers accuse immigrants both of being lazy and of stealing all the jobs in Britain, and wondered how this is possible.

Some Farage-haters focused on perceived flaws or quirks in the UKIP leader’s physical appearance, and Farage was compared to a Madame Tussaud’s waxwork, a thick tree truck, and the Simpsons-sourced meme “Wacky waving inflatable arm flailing tube man,” among other things.

One Bremain supporter had unexpectedly positive words to say about Farage — the user said that Farage’s Brexit poster was so bad and off-putting that it probably cost Brexit the vote.

There has been much alarm over Brexit, and one Observer report even claimed that Europe “will be gripped by chaos, Russia will be strengthened [and] all hell will break loose” if the Brexit camp wins.

“If the Leave vote prevails, whatever the merits of the matter, European politics will be gripped by chaos, Russia will be strengthened by the crisis in the European unity, and make no mistake, all hell will break lose across the continent with major repercussions on our side of the Atlantic.”

Brits of Polish ancestry have been widely consulted for their view. One Polish/British writer declared in the Independent that he fears Brexit.

“As a Polish immigrant whose family remembers war, this is why I fear Brexit… I suddenly realize that, in fact, around half of Brits do not want me or my family around. And although to call this atmosphere akin to Germany in the 1930s is a silly exaggeration, an insult to the victims of the Nazis, I feel that Britain is moving backwards.

“Call me a Pole with a historic chip on his shoulder, but for me – as for generations of Poles, French, Germans and Italians, and yes, also Brits – Europe and its institutions was the way to prevent another self-inflicted calamity this continent is so famous for.”

Not all Polish Brits felt the same way — a Spectator blogger consulted a number of Poles who support Brexit. Their reasons ranged from a desire to wrest power from bureaucrats, to a desire to see nationalism flourish, to the fact that they now see themselves as much British as they are Polish. One person said that the EU is becoming so suffocating and totalitarian that it reminds her of the way Poland was when she left in 1976.

‘The EU reminds me of a totalitarian state, like Poland was when I left. Like the Soviet Union, the EU is pushing for complete conformity and unity which I find uncomfortable. Brussels is propagating a destruction of national pride.’

[Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images]