Morgan Freeman Dead [On Facebook, Anyway]

UPDATE OF THE UPDATE: In the article, we linked to a smaller “Morgan Freeman Death” Facebook page. The real action is going on at this Facebook group – it’s sitting at over 500k “likes!” Go forth, readers! Flag and flame to put a stop to the idiots perpetuating this ridiculous rumor!

UPDATE: As of this posting, it appears that the “thousands” of fooled masses have figured it out, as the R.I.P. Morgan Freeman Facebook page has shrunk in status to about 30 “likes.” Good job, people!

Morgan Freeman is dead. On Facebook. Yes, the respected actor has become the latest celebrity victim of the fabled “social media death hoax,” a ruthless killer that has claimed many of our beloved celebrities this year.

An R.I.P. Morgan Freeman Facebook page was created on September 5, 2012 claiming that the actor is dead, in much the same way that Bill Cosby was “killed” a short time ago in his own celebrity death hoax. The Cosby death hoax stirred mostly anger and disappointment in people (including a friend of the Cos, who was reportedly left in tears over the rumor) who said that the page was created for no good reason whatsoever, aside from attention and the maker’s contention that it was a “funny prank.” Not so, said the internet. Now, this “thoughtless” and “mean” prank has claimed another: The Dark Knight Rises star Morgan Freeman.

Morgan Freeman is currently in stable condition, recovering from a celebrity death hoax started on Facebook. This viral condition has affected dozens of celebrities just this year, including wrestler/actor John Cena, magician/professional creeper David Blaine, and children’s scientist Bill Nye.

Freeman will have to defend his status as a living celebrity once again (he’s battled fake death hoaxes before, notes NYDaily) in the face of thousands upon thousands of “likes” piling up on the R.I.P. Morgan Freeman page.

“Celebrities are still normal people with family members and friends just like us. How would you feel if someone said your most precious loved one has passed away? You can’t joke about someone’s death,” wrote one Facebook user.

The best way to combat celebrity death hoaxes, as noted by MStarz, is to battle the temptation to “tweet it” until the report can be verified by one of the major and respected media outlets, like this one here. You can also brush up on your Death Hoax spotting skills by taking the Inquisitr’s new Death Hoax 101 course.

So R.I.P., Morgan Freeman. Have a good rest of the day, sir.