Docs Say New Season Of ‘Botched’ Plastic Surgery Is Hotter And Scarier Than Ever

Botched docs Terry Dubrow and Paul Nassif are back with what promises to be the best season of the plastic-surgery-gone-wrong series Botched yet, with many new cases and a few botched surgeries from earlier seasons. And Dubrow and Nassif are back to show that delicate balance between trying to attain a level of perfection and pushing that plastic surgery line too far, ending up Botched.

Plastic surgery is everywhere now, but it is particularly still a mainstay in Hollywood, according to the Inquisitr. E!, the home of Botched, is no stranger to shows that feature plastic surgery, such as Keeping Up With the Kardashians, where there seems to be some level of competition as to who can have the most plastic surgery. Khloe Kardashian in particular now looks like someone else thanks to a variety of cosmetic procedures.

The Daily Beast says that the Botched doctors, Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif, combine the salacious with cautionary tales when trying to help those harmed by plastic surgery and other procedures get their lives back. Botched has outlasted many other shows about plastic surgery makeovers, as it shows how Dubrow and Nassif use the latest techniques to bring people from botched to beautiful, while explaining how the patient or the prior surgeon went wrong.

Terry Dubrow, who is also sometimes on Real Housewives of Orange County with his wife Heather Dubrow, says that Botched hopefully warns people from going too far with plastic surgery.

“The difference between this show [Botched] and other plastic surgery shows is that we’re not glamorizing plastic surgery. In fact, we’re providing a scare about plastic surgery.”

But as a culture, Dr. Paul Nassif says people like to watch what happens on Botched when things go really wrong.

“Unfortunately, people like to watch train wrecks. But if you can take a train wreck and then add the inspirational aspect of having a good result or a happy ending, I think that fills a void [in reality TV].”

And both Botched docs say that they hope to combine curiosity with inspiration and provide viewers with uplifting stories on Botched that really touch people’s hearts. One of the first cases on Season 3 of Botched brings back a case from a previous season. Rajee Narinesingh, a transgender woman, bought black market filler and ended up with a cement-like filler in her face, which left her deformed.

The Botched docs Dubrow and Nassif actually turned Narinesingh away, thinking that at the time, they couldn’t help her, but they say they never stopped thinking about her case, and how to help her on Botched.

“There are a lot of cases on the show where we bring in people and say, ‘That’s not fixable, but let’s air their stories as a cautionary tale.'” With Narinesingh, it was too risky on the face’s nerve and blood vessels to operate.

The Daily Mail says that the Botched docs Dubrow and Nassif came up with a plan as to how they could help Narinesingh after 10 years of walking around deformed by a mix of cement and tire sealant in her face. Narinesingh was the victim of Oneal Ron Morris, called “toxic tush doctor,” who performed many illegal procedures using Fix-a-Flat, Super Glue, and mineral oil, particularly on the transgender community.

So the Botched docs came up with a plan to localize the hard lumps so that they could be removed. They used a steroid to take out all of the excess inflammation so that they could see where the hard masses were located. Nassif was impressed that the masses were now far more circumscribed and thought that they could be removed.

After several surgeries that were not without risk, Narinesingh, who no longer felt botched, burst into tears of gratitude for the efforts of Dubrow and Nassif.

“‘I feel so pretty’ she told the crowd, explaining that she can’t wait to start her new life with her newfound confidence,” wrote the Daily Mail.

Stay tuned for an exciting, shocking, and hopefully uplifting new season of Botched on E!

Why do you watch Botched? Do you find it uplifting, or do you watch Botched for the shock value?

[Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images]