Sennheiser Revised M2 On-Ear Wireless Headphones Push Beats, Bose, and Bowers & Wilkins To The Side

M2 Wireless

When Sennheiser released the Momentum 2 Wireless headphones earlier this year, many wondered how Bluetooth headphones could ever sound so good. CNET described exactly what the M2 Wireless offered — premium sound for a premium price.

“The Sennheiser Momentum 2.0 Wireless is a well-designed, sturdy headphone, that folds up for more compact storage and features excellent sound over Bluetooth, as well as over a wired connection. The headphone is also equipped with active noise-cancellation and has dual microphones for use as a cell-phone headset.”

Unfortunately, the Sennheiser wireless headphones had a huge defect. Trusted Reviews explained why the M2 Wireless were recalled early this summer.

“A number of users have reported that Bluetooth signals from other sources are preventing the headphones from working properly, both for music playback and receiving calls via a linked smartphone.”

Sennheiser M2 Wireless

After months of waiting, Sennheiser has unleased the REV 2 version of the M2 Wireless On-Ear headphones to Amazon. The revised over-the-ear version, which is available in Europe, should hit U.S. shores in the next couple weeks. However, the on-ear version sounds just as good and is actually $100 cheaper.

Has the Bluetooth problem been fixed? Absolutely! Like other Bluetooth headphones, your sound may scratch in and out a times, but this occurs at about 1 percent of the time. Before the fix, it occurred 25 percent of the time. But you want to know about the sound, right?

The first version of the Sennheiser On-Ear Wireless had bass that went a little overboard. It was punchy, but it felt more like a huge kick in the ears. The over-the-ear wireless headphones balanced the bass and all ranges of sound impressively, and the revised on-ear wireless headphones sound very similar.

The ear pads on the Sennheiser M2 Wireless are the best out of any audio product.

The Sennheiser M2 On-Ear Wireless has AptX technology, which makes the wireless sound more clear and less compressed. To get the AptX effect, you have to have a device that also runs AptX, like the MacBook Pro, Samsung Galaxy S line, and the Galaxy Note line of products. The AptX site has a list of products its Bluetooth technology is supported by. It’s a shame the iPhone does not have AptX technology as there is a noticeable difference when using the M2 Wireless with a Galaxy Note 5 and an iPhone 6s Plus — you can tell you are listening to a pair of wireless headphones when listening with the iPhone 6s Plus. The sound is still good, but produces a more distorted upper-range of the sound spectrum.

The difference between these Sennheiser headphones and the Bowers & Wilkins P5 Wireless (both priced at $399.99) is that Sennheiser offers NoiseGard® technology that works very well, although you can’t turn it off. The Sennheiser, like the Bowers & Wilkins P5, offers excellent phone call quality, though you can actually hear how loud you sound with Sennheiser’s cans. People on the other end of the line said they couldn’t tell that a Bluetooth headset was being used.

Just three years back, high quality Bluetooth headphones seemed like an oxymoron. In 2016, there are several brands making high quality Bluetooth headphones that also offer good phone call quality. Sennheiser easily stands at the top of the list with their updated REV 2 Momentum 2 Wireless On-Ear headphones.

[Feature photo by Daryl Deino]