List Of Nearly 700 Ashley Madison Users’ Names, Physical Addresses And Amounts Spent Dumped Online

It might feel like the world is going a little crazy with the reaction some folks are having to the Impact Team’s hacking of the Ashley Madison website. As reported by the Inquisitr, talk of Ashley Madison hack victims being contacted by reporters, and the victims then contacting lawyers about class action lawsuits to recoup some kind of damage from the hacking has arisen. Now folks are going so far as to literally dump the data they’ve found and downloaded via the hack directly online.

The data dump isn’t merely on the dark web anymore, nor is it merely appearing in some mainstream articles that are pointing out the names of politicians and celebrities on the list. No — the latest list of Ashley Madison user names that has been published to the web contains nearly 700 names, physical addresses (be they the work or home address used when signing up — or a fake one), email addresses and dates of Ashley Madison users. Presumably that last date field represents the date the person joined Ashley Madison, because most of the dates range from 2013 to 2015, and they don’t appear to be older dates such as dates of birth.

Nevertheless, the list also includes the dollar amounts those unfortunately outed Ashley Madison hack victims spent on the site. In fact, the list appears to be sorted in descending fashion, with those who spent the most at the top. That first person is listed as having spent nearly $4,000 on Ashley Madison — either having joined in June or paying a single transaction in June.

The last listed person spent only $14 on the site.

The website where the list of nearly 700 names appears will not be linked to nor will the name of the website be listed in this article. The bold tactic of publishing names and email addresses and physical addresses — especially for private citizens of a hacking who are not public figures, and who tend to enjoy less legal protection in similar matters than the rich and famous — brings forth a whole new world for Internet privacy or the lack thereof.

While more Ashley Madison files were published on Thursday, as reported by USA TODAY‎, questions of ethics continued to bounce around the web. Some sites have made the hacked data searchable, with some including privacy-inducing steps like having to verify users have access to the email they are searching for information.

Others, apparently, are taking matters into their own hands and publishing long lists of Ashley Madison users directly on the web as the military looks into government names on the Ashley Madison list, reports CNN.

[Image via Ashley Madison]