‘Black Spider Memos’ To Be Released, Prince Charles’ Kingship In Jeopardy?

After 10 long years of fighting, The Guardian has finally won the right to release Prince Charles’ secret letters, colorfully named the “Black Spider Memos.” Government agencies are now preparing for the consequences in what some believe might prevent the Prince from ever taking over the throne.

The Supreme Court ruled five to two that the Prime Minister acted outside the bounds of the law when he vetoed the publication of the Black Spider Memos. The disclosure had already been approved by a lower court when the Cameron intervened. The Guardian‘s Rob Evans has been fighting through constant legal challenges against releasing the letters, but the newspaper can finally take a victory lap. According to CNN, Guardian Editor-in-Chief Alan Rusbridger is “delighted” at the Supreme Court decision.

“The government wasted hundreds of thousands of pounds trying to cover up these letters, admitting their publication would ‘seriously damage’ perceptions of the Prince’s political neutrality. Now they must publish them so that the public can make their own judgment.”

The Royals are barred from interfering in the policy-making of the elected government. Although they can express their feelings on government privately, like in the Queen’s one-on-one meetings with Prime Minister, a public disclosure like Prince Charles’ letters could be enough to prevent the Prince’s ascent to the throne.

As previously reported by the Inquisitr, David Cameron was overheard saying that the Queen “purred” upon hearing that the Scottish were voting against independence. The embarrassing incident prompted a quick apology from the Prime Minister, but also revealed a candid moment where the Queen supported one position in a political issue: Scottish independence.

That slip-up was small in comparison to what Prince Charles’ letters are likely to reveal.

The Guardian reports that the letters were reportedly sent by Prince Charles and ministers at several Whitehall departments including farming, planning and health in the years 2004 and 2005. The letters might reveal the full extent of Charles’ lobbying efforts, turning him from harmless and apolitical to a shadowy policy manipulator.

According to the Guardian, MP Paul Flynn explained the release might change Charles’ position as heir to the throne.

“If there are serious questions about the suitability of Prince Charles as a monarch, there could be a question in the public mind about whether to skip a generation. The attorney general already said the main justification for keeping the letters secret was they would hinder Charles’s ability to be a successful monarch.”

For his part, Prime Minister David Cameron expressed disappointment about the Supreme Court decision.

“This is a disappointing judgment and we will now consider how to release these letters. This is about the principle that senior members of the royal family are able to express their views to government confidentially. I think most people would agree this is fair enough.”

In the coming weeks, after the media gets a chance to work through the letters, the people will get to judge for themselves if Prince Charles policy work is “fair enough.”

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