War Of Words Erupts Between Led Zeppelin Legend And His Boy Band Neighbour

Led Zeppelin

Led Zeppelin legend Jimmy Page has become embroiled in a bitter planning dispute with his neighbor and former Take That member Robbie Williams.

The rock god and the pop prince are neighbors in the Holland Park area of west London, and Robbie’s plans to do up his £17 million mansion have not gone down at all well with Page who has attacked the former Take That singer’s proposals in a strongly-worded letter to Kensington and Chelsea council stating, “the exterior should be considered sacrosanct.”

As celebrity feuds go, it’s certainly one symbolic of the uneasy relationship between rock stars and pop tarts. In the blue corner you have a lean, mean world-beating rock colossus, a heavy metal riff machine responsible for some of the finest guitar plying in the history of the genre. In the red corner you have a former boy band member who has in the past struggled with caffeine addiction and weight issues.

robbie-williams

The Daily Mail reports that Williams plans to significantly revamp the 46-room mansion he bought in 2013 from the late film director Michael Winner. The former boy-band pin-up proposes to install a lift and a recording studio.

However, Page has a number of concerns regarding the development, and surprisingly it’s not because having a new recording studio would enable Williams to make another record. No! Page who has lived in the nearby Grade I listed Tower House for 40 years believes Robbie’s plans would be hugely detrimental to the surrounding area. and that because Williams’s property is Grade II listed, the exterior should be considered ‘sacrosanct’.

“I have been responsible for the protection of the Tower House for over 40 years and I am always concerned when proposals are made for nearby properties which may be detrimental to the well-being of this important heritage asset.

“A new window planned by Williams will overlook the side of my house and back garden, which will have a significant impact on the amenity of my property. I am also concerned that work on the underground swimming pool could cause vibrations and possible structural damage to Tower House.”

Page, aged 71, also objects to Williams knocking down part of his home’s boundary wall to allow access to a planned garden car park.

“This will be detrimental to the general amenity of the conservation area as well as destroying part of the attractive boundary wall.”

A decision on the plans is expected by the end of January. Seconds out, round two.